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fightclub30
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This thread got bombed, hope it is okay to start a new one.

I have had a recruiter bugged be for a few weeks. That I came highly recommended, am an ideal candidate for this position, yadda, yadda, blah. I am not actively looking for a job but figured I would listen. I talked to them on the phone for the second time today, and they said I seemed to be the best fit. They will not give me any additional information until I provide a resume and project list, with a bunch of information. I told them "hey, you called me, I didn't call you..." and said I was too busy to provide that information right now and just ended the call pretty quickly.

Is this pretty common practice? They are ready to introduce me to the company they are hiring for, but won't give me any information until I provide a resume and project list. This feels like a way to just get someone in a database, so that they can say the have X number of people they are connected with. Do I risk burning any bridges if I just walk away at this point? I have never dealt with a recruiter before. I mostly assume they just start randomly calling people as my contact info is on my companies website.


   
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gopheritall
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I wouldn't worry about it. Most recruiters are just trying to get everyone's name they can so that if you start looking you go them first.

I would have asked them how they determined I was a great fit without my resume. I would also ask specifics about the hiring company but not their name. It is fair to have them withhold the name.

I would also ask how the recruiting company knows the hiring company and how many people they have placed at that company in the past. As someone how hires, I get recruiters blindly reaching out all the time.

If you are open to meeting the other company then a resume would be needed. The recruiting company needs to establish that they found you so the hiring company doesn't try to cut out the middleman (and their hefty fee).


   
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Jupiter ♃
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Sorry... I did some automatic pruning. There must not have been a reply to the previous thread in 180 days. Always welcome to create a new thread.

Do not like how this board is run?
Get your own board!


   
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davescharf
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You won’t burn a bridge. Recruiters are out fishing all the time. I don’t even answer my work phone any more because it’s either recruiters or contract firms trying to tell me they can solve all my contingent resource needs.

LinkedIn is getting bad too. I’m willing to connect with anyone if I don’t know them and they take the time to tell me why they want to connect. Sadly most of the time it’s just someone trying to sell me something


   
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fightclub30
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Thanks. I asked specifics, and they gave a lot of very vague answers. They asked me what my ideal salary would be, I said $150,000 - they didn't see the humor and I said, well, you asked for my ideal salary. I gave them a number that I think I am worth (and what it would take to get me to consider a move right now), to which they said oh, do you have a bare minimum. Yeah... that's the number I just gave you, that's what I am looking for if I were to move right now. I asked about where the company was located, is it downtown? Are they 100% in office? etc. Couldn't get much info there. They wanted a home address for me and they would type it into google and give me a commute time. Couldn't tell me if there was a 401k match, or even health insurance.

I haven't looked for a job in 8 years, none of my info is current. I told them it would take me a week or more to get my resume and most recent 15 project list together. They seemed surprised and irritated it would take me that long. They also tried to ask 3 different times what my current salary was, and when I wasn't willing to share that they said it was a "critical piece of information for them in this process."

If they approached me and told me about the job position and the potential employer first, then asked me if I was interested in it - I would probably feel differently. Here they are asking all about me first while I try to scratch for info about the job. It feels completely backwards and seems like a major fishing expedition. So I am just going to ignore them. I was worried about burning a bridge with a potential firm to work for, not necessarily this recruiter. But it seems clear the firm doesn't know me yet, and this recruiter isn't going to share my info with them if I am non-responsive otherwise the firm could just talk to me directly. I am up to my eyeballs in work right now (I don't know anyone who isn't) and am fine with my job, I don't need a homework assignment right now to aid a recruiting agency in setting up profiles.

Thanks for the feedback guys.


   
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gator
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I would be clueless if I had to apply for a job. I haven’t had to apply for a full time job since Jan. 1998. I have had a small handful of interviews for being a beer vendor at the original stadium, temporary stadium and new stadium stadiums for the Vikings and Twins.

Keep your stick on the ice...


   
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davescharf
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fightclub30 wrote:

Thanks. I asked specifics, and they gave a lot of very vague answers. They asked me what my ideal salary would be, I said $150,000 - they didn't see the humor and I said, well, you asked for my ideal salary. I gave them a number that I think I am worth (and what it would take to get me to consider a move right now), to which they said oh, do you have a bare minimum. Yeah... that's the number I just gave you, that's what I am looking for if I were to move right now. I asked about where the company was located, is it downtown? Are they 100% in office? etc. Couldn't get much info there. They wanted a home address for me and they would type it into google and give me a commute time. Couldn't tell me if there was a 401k match, or even health insurance.

I haven't looked for a job in 8 years, none of my info is current. I told them it would take me a week or more to get my resume and most recent 15 project list together. They seemed surprised and irritated it would take me that long. They also tried to ask 3 different times what my current salary was, and when I wasn't willing to share that they said it was a "critical piece of information for them in this process."

If they approached me and told me about the job position and the potential employer first, then asked me if I was interested in it - I would probably feel differently. Here they are asking all about me first while I try to scratch for info about the job. It feels completely backwards and seems like a major fishing expedition. So I am just going to ignore them. I was worried about burning a bridge with a potential firm to work for, not necessarily this recruiter. But it seems clear the firm doesn't know me yet, and this recruiter isn't going to share my info with them if I am non-responsive otherwise the firm could just talk to me directly. I am up to my eyeballs in work right now (I don't know anyone who isn't) and am fine with my job, I don't need a homework assignment right now to aid a recruiting agency in setting up profiles.

Thanks for the feedback guys.

Very few recruiters will treat you as anything more than to get another placement towards their quotas. Either this entire situation is fishy, the recruiter is completely clueless, or both. Based on this I vote 'both'. In the IT world that I live in the average lifespan of a recruiter at any one particular company seems to be 2-3 years. A company is hardly going to care about a specific candidate (or remember who it was anyways) unless that person has applied and likely had some form of direct discussion. I know people who have their resume out literally all of the time just in case something they like better comes along.

When a good recruiter asks what your ideal salary is then can always say whether it's realistic or not because they should know what their client on the other end is roughly willing to pay. Them needing to know your salary is completely irrelevant to the discussion and, to me, a borderline unprofessional question to ask solely because of its irrelevance. I have a guy who worked for me and left in the midst of our reorganization because his new manager gave him zero confidence there was a place for him in his org and he got an 80% salary increase at the new employer. I guarantee his new employer could care less what he was making for us...they thought he was the right person for their position.


   
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Kelly Red
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fightclub30 wrote:

Thanks. I asked specifics, and they gave a lot of very vague answers. They asked me what my ideal salary would be, I said $150,000 - they didn't see the humor and I said, well, you asked for my ideal salary. I gave them a number that I think I am worth (and what it would take to get me to consider a move right now), to which they said oh, do you have a bare minimum. Yeah... that's the number I just gave you, that's what I am looking for if I were to move right now. I asked about where the company was located, is it downtown? Are they 100% in office? etc. Couldn't get much info there. They wanted a home address for me and they would type it into google and give me a commute time. Couldn't tell me if there was a 401k match, or even health insurance.

I haven't looked for a job in 8 years, none of my info is current. I told them it would take me a week or more to get my resume and most recent 15 project list together. They seemed surprised and irritated it would take me that long. They also tried to ask 3 different times what my current salary was, and when I wasn't willing to share that they said it was a "critical piece of information for them in this process."

If they approached me and told me about the job position and the potential employer first, then asked me if I was interested in it - I would probably feel differently. Here they are asking all about me first while I try to scratch for info about the job. It feels completely backwards and seems like a major fishing expedition. So I am just going to ignore them. I was worried about burning a bridge with a potential firm to work for, not necessarily this recruiter. But it seems clear the firm doesn't know me yet, and this recruiter isn't going to share my info with them if I am non-responsive otherwise the firm could just talk to me directly. I am up to my eyeballs in work right now (I don't know anyone who isn't) and am fine with my job, I don't need a homework assignment right now to aid a recruiting agency in setting up profiles.

Thanks for the feedback guys.

This is a complete fishing expedition. They want to build their own data on jobs like yours, current salary levels, qualifications, job skills. They don’t have a job, they’re building data to offer future corporations.

Most head hunters don’t tell you the name of the company early on, they don’t want you to bypass them. But the fact they won’t even tell you a vague location like Eagan is a red flag. Plus insisting your current salary is a critical piece is nonsense. If there was a real job they’d offer up a salary range to entice you to go forward. Don’t worry about bridges and don’t waste anymore of your time.

What have I got? I got no snacks and I got no respect.
Travis-age 6


   
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The Rube
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gator wrote:

I would be clueless if I had to apply for a job. I haven’t had to apply for a full time job since Jan. 1998. I have had a small handful of interviews for being a beer vendor at the original stadium, temporary stadium and new stadium stadiums for the Vikings and Twins.

Pretty much the same. My "interview" for my side gig was:

So, you know Employees A and B?

Yup, a couple years now.

You know beer, correct?

Most definitely.

How about spirits?

I know the brown water, some vodka, zero tequila, a little about gin. FTR, I know NOTHING about wine except if it's red or white.

Alright, when do you want to start? You'd be a mid-shifter, so choose your own hours.

Yeah, that was a bit different.

When you tell somebody somethin', it depends on what part of the United States you're standin' in... as to just how dumb you are.


   
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HockeyBum
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I work for a small, family-owned manufacturing company (50ish employees). Up until about 2 years ago, things were always stable and fine. I won’t go into details, but over the last 2 years we’ve lost most of our quality, experienced, long-time employees. Some of those people had been here 20 years or more. What started with a trickle of resignations has turned into a flood over the past 6 months. We lost so many good people so quickly, there hasn’t been enough experienced people left to train new employees. This has created chaos in our factory since nobody is properly trained. Our quality control has become horrendous.

My manager (who has been here almost 30 years and was the one who hired me) resigned this week. I just found out another long-time employee resigned today. I’ve been here 20 years, and I’m probably now one of the 5 most senior people here. I stayed longer than I probably should have because the fringe benefits were great (short commute, nice office with a window, lots of vacation time, flexibility to leave early to get to my kids’ activities, etc…).

I’ve decided it’s probably time to get off the Titanic while lifeboats are still available. Officially my job title is Project Manager in our sales division, but over the years my job has morphed into a weird combination of sales, customer service, engineering, and production manager. I’ll be spending the weekend getting my resume updated.

I’ve been out of the job seeker/interview game so long that the thought starting over at a new company is pretty overwhelming. If anyone has any job leads, or even just helpful advice, please shoot me a PM. I would like to stay in the eastern half of the TC metro if possible.


   
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Chill Kessel
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I think I know a guy in the same type of field. I'll reach out and let you know if I dig up any leads.

As an alternative, the wild need a goalie


   
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HockeyBum
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I have goaltending experience. Not at the NHL level, but I'm trainable. :good2:


   
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Chill Kessel
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I don't know if this is the best spot to post this but I am looking for someone with a connection at Hormel. A friend is organizing a charity event and would like to purchase about 10,000 jars of Skippy and would prefer to buy direct rather than from a grocery store.


   
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Cowgirl
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Posted by: @chill-kessel

I don't know if this is the best spot to post this but I am looking for someone with a connection at Hormel. A friend is organizing a charity event and would like to purchase about 10,000 jars of Skippy and would prefer to buy direct rather than from a grocery store.

Ooc, what does one do with 10K jars of skippy…..??!


   
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Chill Kessel
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Donates them, along with other food items to kids who rely on school lunches and would otherwise be unable to eat during christmas break and spring break.


   
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Jerry Peters fka DAWoJ
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I've been a mortgage consultant for 26 years which encompases a vast majority of my adult life.  I feel like I'm in a serious rut and have started thinking about making a career change.  The problem is that I don't really know where to start.   I haven't written a resume in a quarter century and I'm not sure what I want my next job to be or what else I am qualified to do.

Has anyone else been in a similar position?  For anyone with experience in HR or hiring, what advice would you give me?


   
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gator
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@don-adams-wheel-of-justice 

I’m somewhat in the same boat. I’ve done same kind of work in the lab/medical world since 1998. I wouldn’t know what to do if I left. Nothing really jumps out at me. And the idea of starting over and things like interviews and resumes. In the last 2 months I’ve taking on a new role in the lab. More responsibility, but the pay isn’t what it should be. Though the job security skyrocketed.

I feel I have fair and reasonable understanding what people are worth, especially in the medical profession. My prior roles, I feel I was paid fairly. Now not so much. 

Keep your stick on the ice...


   
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HockeyBum
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@don-adams-wheel-of-justice  Unfortunately I don't have any advice to give, but I'm right there with you brother.  I've been at the same job for almost 22 years (I started the day before Sept 11, 2001).  The job itself has always just been "OK".  Didn't love it or hate it, but I liked the job security, short commute, and flexibility to leave when needed for appointments and my kids' activities.  No overtime or weekends.  I leave here at 4:30 and don't have to think about work until the next morning.  My wife makes a good living, so I haven't had to push myself towards something better.  Inertia set in.

The last several months have gotten tougher.  I used to be in a department of 3 people, but since February it's down to just me.  HR keeps telling me they're trying to hire, but nobody has applied.  I can't keep up and the stress has become unbelievably bad.

At this point I don't even know how to start looking for something else.  What I do is so specialized that it doesn't translate well elsewhere (kind of morphed into a mix between a project manager and an engineer... but I don't have an engineering degree).  Now it appears we're heading into a recession, so I'd be a little nervous about leaving.  Kicking myself for not looking harder a few years ago when the job market was better.

Good luck Jerry.


   
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HockeyBum
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I found out on Tuesday that my company is closing for business at the end of December.  I've been there 22 years, so this is a tough pill to swallow.  I'm pretty much an expert at what I do (Project Manager), but it's a niche manufacturing business and I'm not sure how my skills will translate in another industry.  

I've never loved the job, but it was OK, paid the bills, and most important, was close to home and had flexibility.  I could leave to get my kids from school, take them to appointments, make their sporting events, etc...  Once I left work for the day, I didn't have to think about it until the next morning.  Also, being there so long, there is a certain comfort that comes with stability and knowing what you're doing at work.  I have a vast network of customers I've worked with for 15-20 years, but almost all of them are out of state.  A lot of them would probably hire me in an instant, but relocating is out of the question at this point in my life.  My kids are in high school, and I'm not uprooting them.  My wife also has a good job here.

Anyway... my last day is Dec 14.  Not the ideal time of year to be job hunting.  I've been thinking about maybe doing some short-term things until I find something.  Has anyone been a substitute teacher that could give me some insight on that?  Anything else that is flexible and pays decently while in transition?  And if anyone has any leads on a permanent full-time job (East Metro), please DM me.    


   
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Greyeagle
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That stinks. 

You may want to check the large employer in Maplewood, there are some openings in the health care business (it is becoming its own company next year) in a variety of job families but I'm not sure what is internal or external.  Something may catch your eye.

“When your best friend is the son of God, you get tired of losing every argument.”

― Christopher Moore, Lamb: The Gospel According to Biff, Christ's Childhood Pal
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fightclub30
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Posted by: @hockeybum

I found out on Tuesday that my company is closing for business at the end of December.  I've been there 22 years, so this is a tough pill to swallow.  I'm pretty much an expert at what I do (Project Manager), but it's a niche manufacturing business and I'm not sure how my skills will translate in another industry.  

I've never loved the job, but it was OK, paid the bills, and most important, was close to home and had flexibility.  I could leave to get my kids from school, take them to appointments, make their sporting events, etc...  Once I left work for the day, I didn't have to think about it until the next morning.  Also, being there so long, there is a certain comfort that comes with stability and knowing what you're doing at work.  I have a vast network of customers I've worked with for 15-20 years, but almost all of them are out of state.  A lot of them would probably hire me in an instant, but relocating is out of the question at this point in my life.  My kids are in high school, and I'm not uprooting them.  My wife also has a good job here.

Anyway... my last day is Dec 14.  Not the ideal time of year to be job hunting.  I've been thinking about maybe doing some short-term things until I find something.  Has anyone been a substitute teacher that could give me some insight on that?  Anything else that is flexible and pays decently while in transition?  And if anyone has any leads on a permanent full-time job (East Metro), please DM me.    

 

Sorry to hear that.  

On a related note, you are now free to pick up as many holiday tournament games and the inevitable "daytime" scrimmages that teams schedule in December during the break.  Those always got a premium because we had so few guys who were available for them.  

When you say niche manufacturing, what was it?  I am working with a few groups that are expanding operations.  I don't know what their hiring situation is, but they are expanding.  One is a commercial air handling unit manufacturer, one is a medical device company, one is an electric car company.  I can put out feelers if any of those sound interesting.

 


   
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HandyNotDan
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Posted by: @hockeybum

I found out on Tuesday that my company is closing for business at the end of December.  I've been there 22 years, so this is a tough pill to swallow.  I'm pretty much an expert at what I do (Project Manager), but it's a niche manufacturing business and I'm not sure how my skills will translate in another industry.  

I've never loved the job, but it was OK, paid the bills, and most important, was close to home and had flexibility.  I could leave to get my kids from school, take them to appointments, make their sporting events, etc...  Once I left work for the day, I didn't have to think about it until the next morning.  Also, being there so long, there is a certain comfort that comes with stability and knowing what you're doing at work.  I have a vast network of customers I've worked with for 15-20 years, but almost all of them are out of state.  A lot of them would probably hire me in an instant, but relocating is out of the question at this point in my life.  My kids are in high school, and I'm not uprooting them.  My wife also has a good job here.

Anyway... my last day is Dec 14.  Not the ideal time of year to be job hunting.  I've been thinking about maybe doing some short-term things until I find something.  Has anyone been a substitute teacher that could give me some insight on that?  Anything else that is flexible and pays decently while in transition?  And if anyone has any leads on a permanent full-time job (East Metro), please DM me.    

I have been a sub the last 2 years...depending on the district it can pay well considering (usually $180-200 a day sometimes more) and it is nice to be able to make a schedule and not have to worry about conflicts or the weather.  I mean you can make a pretty solid living doing it and honestly you don't really have to do all that much.

The thing is you will run into some teachers that leave you detailed things to do and others that will say "put on this movie" or "make it a study hall" and not care.  No matter what you just are there to make sure the class doesn't go too nuts. (and it will...I have stories)  Do what you can and no one will care how much work was done.

I am not sure where you live, but I will say pretty much every district in the metro needs subs and needs them bad.  I just got a job myself but before that I was on the sub list in Robbinsdale (my home and the best pay around) Wayzata and Osseo.  There are multiple jobs in each district every day for the rest of the year and next year through February.  I could literally work full time...that was actually my plan until a month ago.  It takes some getting used to when you are coming from more structure, but the freedom is pretty sweet.  Plus, if I picked up a shift from someone who maybe doesnt have 7th hour I can leave early!  Last year I long term subbed for someone who had no 6th or 7th and often got to leave right away.  Not always though because districts are so desperate they will ask you to help out.  If you dont feel up to it say no you dont get paid more in most districts.

 


   
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HockeyBum
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Dumb question for the fellas here.  Are men still expected to wear a tie to an interview?  I have 2 interviews coming up, and I haven't done this in over 20 years.  I know the world has changed a lot since then.  It's an office job, but I'm sure the dress code at these places is probably casual (jeans) or business casual at most.  At the office job I had for 20 years, almost everyone wore jeans.  I was the "snappy dresser" and pretty much the only one there who wore nice pants and button down long-sleeve shirts in the winter (no tie), and polo shirts in the summer.  I have a lot of nice clothes like that, but I don't really have a good dress shirt and tie anymore.    


   
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Greyeagle
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Good luck!! 

I haven't had an external interview since the 1980s so I am not the right person to ask but for my most recent internal interview I wore a jacket but not a tie.  Ties are stupid and I and rarely wear one anymore but will wear a jacket.  

I got the job.  😉 

“When your best friend is the son of God, you get tired of losing every argument.”

― Christopher Moore, Lamb: The Gospel According to Biff, Christ's Childhood Pal
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Chill Kessel
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You are probably fine without a tie, but I always err on the side of being dressier if I'm not sure.


   
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Cowgirl
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I would say going the extra mile to look professional may at least get you bonus points for showing you care about your appearance and aren’t lazy! (But I’m not a dude and don’t wear ties so that’s just pure speculation).  😁


   
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Kelly Red
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Here’s a tip I just read in the Wall St Journal, they did a story on nightmare clueless job applicants.

Go to the companies website and social media, look at the photos of employees on the job.  Try to match or slightly exceed the same level of clothing.  Wearing a suit to a company that is super casual won’t win you bonus points, same with showing up in jeans when the majority wear khakis.  Ties are pretty much a no go unless you are corporate or a job with clients that expect it.  My attorney husband still wore a tie to court (judges do not like casual).

The tales in WSJ were stunningly strange; examples included wearing pajama bottoms, graphic tee with offensive language, never removing a baseball hat, a female wearing a strapless cocktail dress.  😳. I guess if you don’t do any of these you’ll be a mile ahead. 

What have I got? I got no snacks and I got no respect.
Travis-age 6


   
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Greyeagle
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Posted by: @kelly-red
The tales in WSJ were stunningly strange; examples included wearing pajama bottoms, graphic tee with offensive language, never removing a baseball hat, a female wearing a strapless cocktail dress.  😳. I guess if you don’t do any of these you’ll be a mile ahead. 

Funny, on WCCO (get off of my lawn!) this morning Vineta was talking about the scary trend of applicants who bring their parent with them to job interviews.  🤯  I can't even imagine.....

If either of my kids suggested I come with them on a job interview....


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“When your best friend is the son of God, you get tired of losing every argument.”

― Christopher Moore, Lamb: The Gospel According to Biff, Christ's Childhood Pal
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YoungEagle
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Posted by: @greyeagle

Posted by: @kelly-red
The tales in WSJ were stunningly strange; examples included wearing pajama bottoms, graphic tee with offensive language, never removing a baseball hat, a female wearing a strapless cocktail dress.  😳. I guess if you don’t do any of these you’ll be a mile ahead. 

Funny, on WCCO (get off of my lawn!) this morning Vineta was talking about the scary trend of applicants who bring their parent with them to job interviews.  🤯  I can't even imagine.....

If either of my kids suggested I come with them on a job interview....


That 70S Show Reaction GIF by Laff

 

 

It’s fine you’d likely be on vacation anyway. 

 

GPL's Resident Cabin Enthusiast & Cadets Hockey Fan


   
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max27t
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Posted by: @greyeagle

Ties are stupid

HOW DARE YOU! Why, a mere 35 years ago I returned from a trip to Amsterdam with a trove of ties, worn for the next few years, but still hung on my tie rack in my closet today. When I see college students today wearing jeans I saw at the U in the 70s, I am confident my tie rack will become an asset again in the next few decades.


   
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The Rube
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Posted by: @chill-kessel

You are probably fine without a tie, but I always err on the side of being dressier if I'm not sure.

 

This. Always better to be overdressed than underdressed. 

 

When you tell somebody somethin', it depends on what part of the United States you're standin' in... as to just how dumb you are.


   
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upnorthkid
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Posted by: @hockeybum

Dumb question for the fellas here.  Are men still expected to wear a tie to an interview?  I have 2 interviews coming up, and I haven't done this in over 20 years.  I know the world has changed a lot since then.  It's an office job, but I'm sure the dress code at these places is probably casual (jeans) or business casual at most.  At the office job I had for 20 years, almost everyone wore jeans.  I was the "snappy dresser" and pretty much the only one there who wore nice pants and button down long-sleeve shirts in the winter (no tie), and polo shirts in the summer.  I have a lot of nice clothes like that, but I don't really have a good dress shirt and tie anymore.    

just interviewed for a ton of jobs (in the medical field). Ties generally unnecessary and it’s important to also dress how you’re comfortable (to a point) as it will make you more at ease and successful in the interview. Have never worn a tie. Suit jacket will add some professionalism to your attire if you think your industry needs it

 


   
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