Portal Forum General General Discussion Home Ownership

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  • #154117 Quote
    Thirty-FourThirty-Four
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    Has anyone bought a load of mulch and had it delivered? If so, anyone you can recommend?

    #154118 Quote
    CowgirlCowgirl
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    Thirty-Four wrote:


    Has anyone bought a load of mulch and had it delivered? If so, anyone you can recommend?

    Gertens is what my lawn guy said is probably your best bet.

    But check mileage on delivery depending on where you live. They are in Inver Grove Heights.

    #154119 Quote
    BertogliatBertogliat
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    Thirty-Four wrote:


    Has anyone bought a load of mulch and had it delivered? If so, anyone you can recommend?

    Landscape supply near you. In Coon Rapids we used Rock Solid and they charged minimal delivery fee because they were also in Coon Rapids.

    #154120 Quote
    BertogliatBertogliat
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    Many of the homes in our neighborhood have foam insulation on the exterior of the exposed block of the basement. This insulation has some sort of tiny decorative pebble sprayed on the foam to help it look nice.

    Does any know of any companies that do this work? We have some neighbors with storm damage and they can’t find a contractor to do the work.

    #154121 Quote
    ThompsThomps
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    Bertogliat wrote:


    Many of the homes in our neighborhood have foam insulation on the exterior of the exposed block of the basement. This insulation has some sort of tiny decorative pebble sprayed on the foam to help it look nice.

    Does any know of any companies that do this work? We have some neighbors with storm damage and they can’t find a contractor to do the work.

    We did it ourselves at the cabin. Just install some wire mesh on the outside of the foam, they have screw strips on the foam to fix the mesh to. Then just apply the concrete add the pebbles in the process. Very easy.

    #154122 Quote
    KarlssonKarlsson
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    Furnace fan stopped blowing last Friday. Called in Centerpoint and they diagnosed the issue as a bad board. They put in a new one, but then our Nest thermostat wouldn’t work. No longer getting power. Guy thought maybe the board he brought was faulty as well, because it was giving him error codes even with his jumper equipment.

    They came back today, board this time is fine, but the Nest still wouldn’t work. I have up and agreed to a different thermostat. They hook it up, test all functions, everything works. We could again turn on the heat, fan, and AC from the thermostat they put in.

    Then they leave, and the AC won’t come on. Furnace and fan work fine, no AC. Obviously it isn’t needed right now, but I’m still pissed. Time to get on the phone with them for the umpteenth time in the last week.

    #154123 Quote
    BertogliatBertogliat
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    Karlsson wrote:


    Furnace fan stopped blowing last Friday. Called in Centerpoint and they diagnosed the issue as a bad board. They put in a new one, but then our Nest thermostat wouldn’t work. No longer getting power. Guy thought maybe the board he brought was faulty as well, because it was giving him error codes even with his jumper equipment.

    They came back today, board this time is fine, but the Nest still wouldn’t work. I have up and agreed to a different thermostat. They hook it up, test all functions, everything works. We could again turn on the heat, fan, and AC from the thermostat they put in.

    Then they leave, and the AC won’t come on. Furnace and fan work fine, no AC. Obviously it isn’t needed right now, but I’m still pissed. Time to get on the phone with them for the umpteenth time in the last week.

    That is a pain in the ass. Thu show up next week between noon and 4 pm.

    #154124 Quote
    dryflydryfly
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    Karlsson wrote:


    Furnace fan stopped blowing last Friday. Called in Centerpoint and they diagnosed the issue as a bad board. They put in a new one, but then our Nest thermostat wouldn’t work. No longer getting power. Guy thought maybe the board he brought was faulty as well, because it was giving him error codes even with his jumper equipment.

    They came back today, board this time is fine, but the Nest still wouldn’t work. I have up and agreed to a different thermostat. They hook it up, test all functions, everything works. We could again turn on the heat, fan, and AC from the thermostat they put in.

    Then they leave, and the AC won’t come on. Furnace and fan work fine, no AC. Obviously it isn’t needed right now, but I’m still pissed. Time to get on the phone with them for the umpteenth time in the last week.


    And people wonder why I have a completely analog 1960s furnace… blower motor separate from furnace (with a rubber v belt no less). I put in a new thermostat to control it (two actually so as to do a crude zonal control but only run one at a time)… but that is as modern as I am going for now … all of it my mechanic and I understand. Super simple. Not the most efficient but not terrible so long as I clean the heat exchanger surfaces occasionally. That and the blower squirrel cage.

    Problem is my mechanic is older than me. If he goes before I do I am going to have to train in a new one. Not sure how that’s gonna work.

    #154125 Quote
    OrionOrion
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    dryfly wrote:


    Karlsson wrote:


    Furnace fan stopped blowing last Friday. Called in Centerpoint and they diagnosed the issue as a bad board. They put in a new one, but then our Nest thermostat wouldn’t work. No longer getting power. Guy thought maybe the board he brought was faulty as well, because it was giving him error codes even with his jumper equipment.

    They came back today, board this time is fine, but the Nest still wouldn’t work. I have up and agreed to a different thermostat. They hook it up, test all functions, everything works. We could again turn on the heat, fan, and AC from the thermostat they put in.

    Then they leave, and the AC won’t come on. Furnace and fan work fine, no AC. Obviously it isn’t needed right now, but I’m still pissed. Time to get on the phone with them for the umpteenth time in the last week.


    And people wonder why I have a completely analog 1960s furnace… blower motor separate from furnace (with a rubber v belt no less). I put in a new thermostat to control it (two actually so as to do a crude zonal control but only run one at a time)… but that is as modern as I am going for now … all of it my mechanic and I understand. Super simple. Not the most efficient but not terrible so long as I clean the heat exchanger surfaces occasionally. That and the blower squirrel cage.

    Problem is my mechanic is older than me. If he goes before I do I am going to have to train in a new one. Not sure how that’s gonna work.


    Must be a pain to crank start that thing on a cold winter morning

    #154126 Quote
    LancasterLancaster
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    dryfly wrote:


    Karlsson wrote:


    Furnace fan stopped blowing last Friday. Called in Centerpoint and they diagnosed the issue as a bad board. They put in a new one, but then our Nest thermostat wouldn’t work. No longer getting power. Guy thought maybe the board he brought was faulty as well, because it was giving him error codes even with his jumper equipment.

    They came back today, board this time is fine, but the Nest still wouldn’t work. I have up and agreed to a different thermostat. They hook it up, test all functions, everything works. We could again turn on the heat, fan, and AC from the thermostat they put in.

    Then they leave, and the AC won’t come on. Furnace and fan work fine, no AC. Obviously it isn’t needed right now, but I’m still pissed. Time to get on the phone with them for the umpteenth time in the last week.

    Problem is my mechanic is older than me. If he goes before I do I am going to have to train in a new one. Not sure how that’s gonna work.

    Sounds like your mechanic is old school. He’s probably a big believer in “good service” and therefore I can’t really see him passing before you!

    #154127 Quote
    dryflydryfly
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    Orion wrote:


    dryfly wrote:


    Karlsson wrote:


    Furnace fan stopped blowing last Friday. Called in Centerpoint and they diagnosed the issue as a bad board. They put in a new one, but then our Nest thermostat wouldn’t work. No longer getting power. Guy thought maybe the board he brought was faulty as well, because it was giving him error codes even with his jumper equipment.

    They came back today, board this time is fine, but the Nest still wouldn’t work. I have up and agreed to a different thermostat. They hook it up, test all functions, everything works. We could again turn on the heat, fan, and AC from the thermostat they put in.

    Then they leave, and the AC won’t come on. Furnace and fan work fine, no AC. Obviously it isn’t needed right now, but I’m still pissed. Time to get on the phone with them for the umpteenth time in the last week.


    And people wonder why I have a completely analog 1960s furnace… blower motor separate from furnace (with a rubber v belt no less). I put in a new thermostat to control it (two actually so as to do a crude zonal control but only run one at a time)… but that is as modern as I am going for now … all of it my mechanic and I understand. Super simple. Not the most efficient but not terrible so long as I clean the heat exchanger surfaces occasionally. That and the blower squirrel cage.

    Problem is my mechanic is older than me. If he goes before I do I am going to have to train in a new one. Not sure how that’s gonna work.


    Must be a pain to crank start that thing on a cold winter morning


    My back up is a wood stove – which I use to area heat part of the house. So the old furnace is ‘high tech’ in comparison.

    I have a 100 year old house that originally was gravity coal heat. The ducts work is really a problem to retrofit. On top of that many of the joints have asbestos collars to seal off leaks. You don’t just replace that – you either do not touch and leave as is OR hazmat team replaces. I try to leave as is.

    Ironically I understand modern HVAC really well – sold to manufacturers in that space – worked on cutting edge products like solar optimized heat pumps and ac loaded with IoT capability. It’s just really hard to adapt any of that into a house as old as mine. I realized that long ago – if I am going to do that it’s going to have to be part of a total rebuild and I am not going to do that. The next owner can do that – if they want.

    The problems Karlsson described would be my problems too but probably times 100.

    #154128 Quote
    BertogliatBertogliat
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    dryfly wrote:


    Karlsson wrote:


    Furnace fan stopped blowing last Friday. Called in Centerpoint and they diagnosed the issue as a bad board. They put in a new one, but then our Nest thermostat wouldn’t work. No longer getting power. Guy thought maybe the board he brought was faulty as well, because it was giving him error codes even with his jumper equipment.

    They came back today, board this time is fine, but the Nest still wouldn’t work. I have up and agreed to a different thermostat. They hook it up, test all functions, everything works. We could again turn on the heat, fan, and AC from the thermostat they put in.

    Then they leave, and the AC won’t come on. Furnace and fan work fine, no AC. Obviously it isn’t needed right now, but I’m still pissed. Time to get on the phone with them for the umpteenth time in the last week.


    And people wonder why I have a completely analog 1960s furnace… blower motor separate from furnace (with a rubber v belt no less). I put in a new thermostat to control it (two actually so as to do a crude zonal control but only run one at a time)… but that is as modern as I am going for now … all of it my mechanic and I understand. Super simple. Not the most efficient but not terrible so long as I clean the heat exchanger surfaces occasionally. That and the blower squirrel cage.

    Problem is my mechanic is older than me. If he goes before I do I am going to have to train in a new one. Not sure how that’s gonna work.

    If you have a mechanic who is trained in on your furnace, my guess is it isn’t as simple as you imply. :lol:

    #154129 Quote
    Kelly RedKelly Red
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    dryfly wrote:


    Karlsson wrote:


    Furnace fan stopped blowing last Friday. Called in Centerpoint and they diagnosed the issue as a bad board. They put in a new one, but then our Nest thermostat wouldn’t work. No longer getting power. Guy thought maybe the board he brought was faulty as well, because it was giving him error codes even with his jumper equipment.

    They came back today, board this time is fine, but the Nest still wouldn’t work. I have up and agreed to a different thermostat. They hook it up, test all functions, everything works. We could again turn on the heat, fan, and AC from the thermostat they put in.

    Then they leave, and the AC won’t come on. Furnace and fan work fine, no AC. Obviously it isn’t needed right now, but I’m still pissed. Time to get on the phone with them for the umpteenth time in the last week.


    And people wonder why I have a completely analog 1960s furnace… blower motor separate from furnace (with a rubber v belt no less). I put in a new thermostat to control it (two actually so as to do a crude zonal control but only run one at a time)… but that is as modern as I am going for now … all of it my mechanic and I understand. Super simple. Not the most efficient but not terrible so long as I clean the heat exchanger surfaces occasionally. That and the blower squirrel cage.

    Problem is my mechanic is older than me. If he goes before I do I am going to have to train in a new one. Not sure how that’s gonna work.

    :lol: Ours is a late 1920’s monster truck in the basement! It’s massive. Every time we have it cleaned and checked the guys say the same thing, “that will run for another century with proper care”. Even my cousins husband who was in the heating and cooling business in N. MN said, leave it in place, you’ll never get better operation. We have radiator heat so the “savings and efficiency” of a new furnace is a mote point, we’re only going to get a nominal increase in efficiency but we’re not willing to give up the ease of care. No computer boards, no control panel, moving parts I can count on one hand, basically nothing to break down.

    #154130 Quote
    dryflydryfly
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    Bertogliat wrote:


    dryfly wrote:


    Karlsson wrote:


    Furnace fan stopped blowing last Friday. Called in Centerpoint and they diagnosed the issue as a bad board. They put in a new one, but then our Nest thermostat wouldn’t work. No longer getting power. Guy thought maybe the board he brought was faulty as well, because it was giving him error codes even with his jumper equipment.

    They came back today, board this time is fine, but the Nest still wouldn’t work. I have up and agreed to a different thermostat. They hook it up, test all functions, everything works. We could again turn on the heat, fan, and AC from the thermostat they put in.

    Then they leave, and the AC won’t come on. Furnace and fan work fine, no AC. Obviously it isn’t needed right now, but I’m still pissed. Time to get on the phone with them for the umpteenth time in the last week.


    And people wonder why I have a completely analog 1960s furnace… blower motor separate from furnace (with a rubber v belt no less). I put in a new thermostat to control it (two actually so as to do a crude zonal control but only run one at a time)… but that is as modern as I am going for now … all of it my mechanic and I understand. Super simple. Not the most efficient but not terrible so long as I clean the heat exchanger surfaces occasionally. That and the blower squirrel cage.

    Problem is my mechanic is older than me. If he goes before I do I am going to have to train in a new one. Not sure how that’s gonna work.

    If you have a mechanic who is trained in on your furnace, my guess is it isn’t as simple as you imply. :lol:


    It’s getting the freaking parts – and doing things like pressing new bearings into the squirrel cage. Had to do that about five years ago … while doing it he said he found a mummified dead bat in it – probably like twenty or so years old! Not sure I’d get many millennial HVAC techs to want to work on that. If you know some please recommend.

    #154131 Quote
    dryflydryfly
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    Kelly Red wrote:


    dryfly wrote:


    Karlsson wrote:


    Furnace fan stopped blowing last Friday. Called in Centerpoint and they diagnosed the issue as a bad board. They put in a new one, but then our Nest thermostat wouldn’t work. No longer getting power. Guy thought maybe the board he brought was faulty as well, because it was giving him error codes even with his jumper equipment.

    They came back today, board this time is fine, but the Nest still wouldn’t work. I have up and agreed to a different thermostat. They hook it up, test all functions, everything works. We could again turn on the heat, fan, and AC from the thermostat they put in.

    Then they leave, and the AC won’t come on. Furnace and fan work fine, no AC. Obviously it isn’t needed right now, but I’m still pissed. Time to get on the phone with them for the umpteenth time in the last week.


    And people wonder why I have a completely analog 1960s furnace… blower motor separate from furnace (with a rubber v belt no less). I put in a new thermostat to control it (two actually so as to do a crude zonal control but only run one at a time)… but that is as modern as I am going for now … all of it my mechanic and I understand. Super simple. Not the most efficient but not terrible so long as I clean the heat exchanger surfaces occasionally. That and the blower squirrel cage.

    Problem is my mechanic is older than me. If he goes before I do I am going to have to train in a new one. Not sure how that’s gonna work.

    :lol: Ours is a late 1920’s monster truck in the basement! It’s massive. Every time we have it cleaned and checked the guys say the same thing, “that will run for another century with proper care”. Even my cousins husband who was in the heating and cooling business in N. MN said, leave it in place, you’ll never get better operation. We have radiator heat so the “savings and efficiency” of a new furnace is a mote point, we’re only going to get a nominal increase in efficiency but we’re not willing to give up the ease of care. No computer boards, no control panel, moving parts I can count on one hand, basically nothing to break down.


    That’s great – mine is new compared to yours. Not exactly sure how old but guessing it was put in after ‘the war’ … meaning WWII of course. We moved in around 1984 and it looked really old then so guessing it was put in the 1950s? There was a coal shoot that was walled off so guessing the first furnace was coal. When gas became available they probably made the switch then.

    It also had a cistern that was collapsing so we filled it in. Old houses are crazy.

    But yes I agree – not going to fix what isn’t broken.

    #154132 Quote
    KarlssonKarlsson
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    FINALLY got a Centerpoint guy out yesterday that has a background in electrical. The wires up at the thermostat are different colors than the wires at the control board on the furnace. How’d he figure this out? Looked at the damn junction box. Now I feel dumb. :mrgreen:

    Good to have AC back.

    #154133 Quote
    D2DD2D
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    Karlsson wrote:


    FINALLY got a Centerpoint guy out yesterday that has a background in electrical. The wires up at the thermostat are different colors than the wires at the control board on the furnace. How’d he figure this out? Looked at the damn junction box. Now I feel dumb. :mrgreen:

    Good to have AC back.


    I just replaced a 30 year-old thermostat that gave out. Fortunately the instructions for the new one were very good and the colors of all the wires matched up.

    #154134 Quote
    gopherguy06gopherguy06
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    First winter in the new house. All the windows seem to be sweating a lot and even have ice on the bottom of them. Looking closer, there is mold near the wood. Any ideas on what to do to prevent or help?

    Also, noticed on the basement wall, there is a wetness on the wall. Almost like it is coming from inside of the wall. I can’t post a photo since it is too large.

    #154135 Quote
    GO4GO4
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    gopherguy06 wrote:


    First winter in the new house. All the windows seem to be sweating a lot and even have ice on the bottom of them. Looking closer, there is mold near the wood. Any ideas on what to do to prevent or help?

    Also, noticed on the basement wall, there is a wetness on the wall. Almost like it is coming from inside of the wall. I can’t post a photo since it is too large.

    This is a good overview and feel free to search more but it is basically because of the humidity in your home.

    Do you have an ERV? Most newer homes do.

    Do you have a humidifier?

    At the temperatures out now (negative whatever) it is nearly impossible to prevent condensation. I try to wipe it up as much as possible (weekly?) to prevent mold growth. I also have played with my ERV and whole house humidifier settings and have found a pretty good balance for both that gives me enough humidity without causing condensation on most of my windows. Depending on how bad it is and your particular situation you may need to do more before it becomes a bigger problem. I’m no expert so hopefully someone can elaborate.

    The wetness on the wall in the basement scares me. You should definitely get more input from someone here or a professional.

    #154136 Quote
    BertogliatBertogliat
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    gopherguy06 wrote:


    First winter in the new house. All the windows seem to be sweating a lot and even have ice on the bottom of them. Looking closer, there is mold near the wood. Any ideas on what to do to prevent or help?

    Also, noticed on the basement wall, there is a wetness on the wall. Almost like it is coming from inside of the wall. I can’t post a photo since it is too large.

    Do you have shades that block airflow to the windows?

    At our old house we had nice shades that fit tight to the inside of the jams and the lack of airflow meant very cold temps would create frost.

    Our solution was to open the shade completely or, if you have the option. open at the top and bottom to allow convection air flow.

    Fans also help in bad situations.

    #154137 Quote
    Anonymous
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    gopherguy06 wrote:


    First winter in the new house. All the windows seem to be sweating a lot and even have ice on the bottom of them. Looking closer, there is mold near the wood. Any ideas on what to do to prevent or help?

    Also, noticed on the basement wall, there is a wetness on the wall. Almost like it is coming from inside of the wall. I can’t post a photo since it is too large.

    Not sure it would make it into the basement. But I had a gap in the flashing of my plumbing pipe on the roof. When we got that rain/snow over Christmas we got water dripping out of a lite switch, up stairs. It had made it’s way from the attic.

    If you can locate it on the roof and it is in a similar path maybe that is the issue and it found it’s way down?

    Is it a lot of water?

    #154138 Quote
    MNGophers29MNGophers29
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    GO4 is pretty spot on with the windows. The problem with new homes being so tight as well as all of the wood products having extra moisture in them the first couple years, it’s unavoidable. Also, almost all wood flooring in your home requires 35-55% humidity to maintain warranty. Drier temps cause cabinets, woodwork, doors and anything else wood, to shrink up and can cause other issues. That being said, your house would be a greenhouse at 35% right now. 20% is a safe level for the most part, but the other suggestions on keeping window treatments with airflow between them and the glass will help.

    Regarding your basement walls, it could be a variety of things your first year and I would have questions on the construction of your foundation (rubber barrier, weeping tile, etc). Some extra moisture in the block is normal on year 1, the block will also absorb moisture in the warmer months. If you don’t have a running water type wetness on the wall, you can typically apply a product like Drylok to seal it up. Tough to offer any other suggestions and not be vague not seeing it or knowing anything else.

    #154139 Quote
    georgegeorge
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    My furnace tripped off for the second time this morning so far. I suspect it is tripping on low gas pressure. We are third from the end on our branch. When everyone is demanding and then our water heater kicks on, I suspect the furnace pressure drops below safety set point. Kicking myself because I didn’t have the patience to wait for it to reset itself. I pulled the access panel, thus opening that safety switch so it reset when I put the panel back. It’s a condensing Lennox 19 years old. When we first moved in it tripped off on low gas pressure until our meter/regulator got adjusted.

    #154140 Quote
    gopherguy06gopherguy06
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    House is new to us, but built in 2008, so fairly new. The blinds seems to be part of it, so opened them all up.

    Online suggested Humidity too and there are suppose to be some curves with temp and humidity recommendations so I could try to mess with the settings. Hoping it passes with the cold weather.

    Other suggestions would be appreciated.

    #154141 Quote
    BertogliatBertogliat
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    george wrote:


    My furnace tripped off for the second time this morning so far. I suspect it is tripping on low gas pressure. We are third from the end on our branch. When everyone is demanding and then our water heater kicks on, I suspect the furnace pressure drops below safety set point. Kicking myself because I didn’t have the patience to wait for it to reset itself. I pulled the access panel, thus opening that safety switch so it reset when I put the panel back. It’s a condensing Lennox 19 years old. When we first moved in it tripped off on low gas pressure until our meter/regulator got adjusted.

    The Lennox at my old house had flame sensor issues. About once per winter I would have to pull the sensor and use fine grit sandpaper to clean it.

    #154142 Quote
    georgegeorge
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    Bertogliat wrote:


    george wrote:


    My furnace tripped off for the second time this morning so far. I suspect it is tripping on low gas pressure. We are third from the end on our branch. When everyone is demanding and then our water heater kicks on, I suspect the furnace pressure drops below safety set point. Kicking myself because I didn’t have the patience to wait for it to reset itself. I pulled the access panel, thus opening that safety switch so it reset when I put the panel back. It’s a condensing Lennox 19 years old. When we first moved in it tripped off on low gas pressure until our meter/regulator got adjusted.

    The Lennox at my old house had flame sensor issues. About once per winter I would have to pull the sensor and use fine grit sandpaper to clean it.

    Good point, I haven’t cleaned that in a while. Suspicious to me though that it’s happening on the coldest day and the water heater next to the furnace is running.

    #154143 Quote
    BertogliatBertogliat
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    george wrote:


    Bertogliat wrote:


    george wrote:


    My furnace tripped off for the second time this morning so far. I suspect it is tripping on low gas pressure. We are third from the end on our branch. When everyone is demanding and then our water heater kicks on, I suspect the furnace pressure drops below safety set point. Kicking myself because I didn’t have the patience to wait for it to reset itself. I pulled the access panel, thus opening that safety switch so it reset when I put the panel back. It’s a condensing Lennox 19 years old. When we first moved in it tripped off on low gas pressure until our meter/regulator got adjusted.

    The Lennox at my old house had flame sensor issues. About once per winter I would have to pull the sensor and use fine grit sandpaper to clean it.

    Good point, I haven’t cleaned that in a while. Suspicious to me though that it’s happening on the coldest day and the water heater next to the furnace is running.

    Centerpoint is now asking people to turn thermostats down to 60 degrees because they are having trouble keeping up with demand. This won’t go well.

    Wait for all the pipes to freeze in the walls now. But we can’t have people going without heat either.

    #154144 Quote
    Steve MNSteve MN
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    Bertogliat wrote:


    george wrote:


    Bertogliat wrote:


    george wrote:


    My furnace tripped off for the second time this morning so far. I suspect it is tripping on low gas pressure. We are third from the end on our branch. When everyone is demanding and then our water heater kicks on, I suspect the furnace pressure drops below safety set point. Kicking myself because I didn’t have the patience to wait for it to reset itself. I pulled the access panel, thus opening that safety switch so it reset when I put the panel back. It’s a condensing Lennox 19 years old. When we first moved in it tripped off on low gas pressure until our meter/regulator got adjusted.

    The Lennox at my old house had flame sensor issues. About once per winter I would have to pull the sensor and use fine grit sandpaper to clean it.

    Good point, I haven’t cleaned that in a while. Suspicious to me though that it’s happening on the coldest day and the water heater next to the furnace is running.

    Centerpoint is now asking people to turn thermostats down to 60 degrees because they are having trouble keeping up with demand. This won’t go well.

    Wait for all the pipes to freeze in the walls now. But we can’t have people going without heat either.

    Not seeing that with Centerpoint… seeing that with Xcel up in central MN: “We need those in Becker, Big Lake, Chisago City, Lindstrom, Princeton, and Isanti to reduce use of natural gas.”

    I did bump my thermostat down a bit, though. Can bundle up for the day, probably cheaper anyway.

    #154145 Quote
    MaizeMaize
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    60 degrees won’t freeze pipes. We keep our thermostat there if we’re not going to be home for a few days and have never had an issue.

    #154146 Quote
    Steve MNSteve MN
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    Maize wrote:


    60 degrees won’t freeze pipes. We keep our thermostat there if we’re not going to be home for a few days and have never had an issue.

    Even in this cold, I agree. Down below 50, pipes in walls can be bad, 60+ should be fine.

    #154147 Quote
    BertogliatBertogliat
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    Maize wrote:


    60 degrees won’t freeze pipes. We keep our thermostat there if we’re not going to be home for a few days and have never had an issue.

    But have you done so when the temp outside is -30? I would worry about some of the old homes with poor insulation and exterior wall plumbing.

    I lived in an apartment years ago and woke up to a pipe that burst in the walls and sprayed water and wet sheetrock throughout my living room. My temp wasn’t set low, but they had shitty insulation and a pipe near a door jam.

    #154148 Quote
    Jane FondaJane Fonda
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    Bertogliat wrote:


    Maize wrote:


    60 degrees won’t freeze pipes. We keep our thermostat there if we’re not going to be home for a few days and have never had an issue.

    But have you done so when the temp outside is -30? I would worry about some of the old homes with poor insulation and exterior wall plumbing.

    I lived in an apartment years ago and woke up to a pipe that burst in the walls and sprayed water and wet sheetrock throughout my living room. My temp wasn’t set low, but they had shitty insulation and a pipe near a door jam.

    In short, just because the interior temperature of the house is 60 degrees, that doesn’t mean it isn’t much colder where pipes are running, depending on the location, and quality of insulation. I would worry about some houses plumbing even without dropping the temp down to 60.

    #154149 Quote
    gopherguy06gopherguy06
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    On a separate note, anyone ever been a landlord or dealt with the eviction process? Can you kick someone out for paying rent late?

    Our old townhouse had someone move in and the first month didn’t get the full month’s rent until 22nd of the month. Lease says due the 1st, late after the 5th. It is now January 30 and haven’t received the full rent with some still outstanding. My thought was if it ever gets to the next month, I would work to kick them out, but haven’t cared as long as I get the full rent by EOM despite being late (with a late fee).

    #154150 Quote
    davescharfdavescharf
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    gopherguy06 wrote:


    On a separate note, anyone ever been a landlord or dealt with the eviction process? Can you kick someone out for paying rent late?

    Our old townhouse had someone move in and the first month didn’t get the full month’s rent until 22nd of the month. Lease says due the 1st, late after the 5th. It is now January 30 and haven’t received the full rent with some still outstanding. My thought was if it ever gets to the next month, I would work to kick them out, but haven’t cared as long as I get the full rent by EOM despite being late (with a late fee).

    You should talk to a lawyer about this and be very formal about the process. If they’re already not paying the rent then you will consistently have this problem unless it was a circumstance like the guy being a federal employee.

    Evicting after one month seems pretty extreme (and I suspect illegal without some kind of due process) but you should talk to a professional about it.

    #154151 Quote
    GO4GO4
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    gopherguy06 wrote:


    Online suggested Humidity too and there are suppose to be some curves with temp and humidity recommendations so I could try to mess with the settings. Hoping it passes with the cold weather.

    Other suggestions would be appreciated.


    What do you mean by “online suggested humidity”? Think you accidentally missed a word. :)

    If you are running a whole home humidifier turn it down some. You should probably buy a hygrometer (to measure humidity). You are correct in that there are curves with temperature and their respective humidity recommendations.

    If outside temperature is 20 to 40 degrees, humidity indoors should not be more than 40 percent.

    • If outside temperature is 10 to 20 degrees, humidity indoors should not be more than 35 percent.

    • If outside temperature is 0 to 10 degrees, humidity indoors should not be more than 30 percent.

    • If outside temperature is 10-below to 0, humidity indoors should not be more than 25 percent.

    • If outside temperature is 20-below to 10-below, humidity indoors should not be more than 20 percent.

    • If outdoor temperature is lower than 20-below, inside humidity should not be more than 15 percent.

    Staying in the correct range and keeping the North facing windows frost free at these temps is nearly impossible but I can say my ecobee thermostat has helped. There are a couple settings in it where I can let it regulate humidity using my humidifier based on the efficiency of my windows and the temperature outside. I’d say from about 10F and up my windows are normally free of condensation. The exception is the big window in my master bedroom. It is on the second floor (generally higher humidity) and the shower is used daily (bathroom fan can’t keep up).

    #154152 Quote
    streakygopherstreakygopher
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    GO4 wrote:


    gopherguy06 wrote:


    Online suggested Humidity too and there are suppose to be some curves with temp and humidity recommendations so I could try to mess with the settings. Hoping it passes with the cold weather.

    Other suggestions would be appreciated.


    What do you mean by “online suggested humidity”? Think you accidentally missed a word. :)

    If you are running a whole home humidifier turn it down some. You should probably buy a hygrometer (to measure humidity). You are correct in that there are curves with temperature and their respective humidity recommendations.

    If outside temperature is 20 to 40 degrees, humidity indoors should not be more than 40 percent.

    • If outside temperature is 10 to 20 degrees, humidity indoors should not be more than 35 percent.

    • If outside temperature is 0 to 10 degrees, humidity indoors should not be more than 30 percent.

    • If outside temperature is 10-below to 0, humidity indoors should not be more than 25 percent.

    • If outside temperature is 20-below to 10-below, humidity indoors should not be more than 20 percent.

    • If outdoor temperature is lower than 20-below, inside humidity should not be more than 15 percent.

    Staying in the correct range and keeping the North facing windows frost free at these temps is nearly impossible but I can say my ecobee thermostat has helped. There are a couple settings in it where I can let it regulate humidity using my humidifier based on the efficiency of my windows and the temperature outside. I’d say from about 10F and up my windows are normally free of condensation. The exception is the big window in my master bedroom. It is on the second floor (generally higher humidity) and the shower is used daily (bathroom fan can’t keep up).

    Our windows are 25 years old and some of the them get a little frosted during the coldest temperatures. The frost doesn’t both me, but when it melts, the water can damage the windows. Simple fix? On the worst days of the year like this I face a fan against the windows. Problem solved.

    #154153 Quote
    gopherguy06gopherguy06
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    davescharf wrote:


    gopherguy06 wrote:


    On a separate note, anyone ever been a landlord or dealt with the eviction process? Can you kick someone out for paying rent late?

    Our old townhouse had someone move in and the first month didn’t get the full month’s rent until 22nd of the month. Lease says due the 1st, late after the 5th. It is now January 30 and haven’t received the full rent with some still outstanding. My thought was if it ever gets to the next month, I would work to kick them out, but haven’t cared as long as I get the full rent by EOM despite being late (with a late fee).

    You should talk to a lawyer about this and be very formal about the process. If they’re already not paying the rent then you will consistently have this problem unless it was a circumstance like the guy being a federal employee.

    Evicting after one month seems pretty extreme (and I suspect illegal without some kind of due process) but you should talk to a professional about it.

    Third month of being late and that’s after fighting tooth and nail to get chase it. If he is late now, no reason to think he will suddenly be better. not ready to cut ties yet but exploring options or seeing if anyone has had to deal

    #154154 Quote
    gopherguy06gopherguy06
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    GO4 wrote:


    gopherguy06 wrote:


    Online suggested Humidity too and there are suppose to be some curves with temp and humidity recommendations so I could try to mess with the settings. Hoping it passes with the cold weather.

    Other suggestions would be appreciated.


    What do you mean by “online suggested humidity”? Think you accidentally missed a word. :)

    If you are running a whole home humidifier turn it down some. You should probably buy a hygrometer (to measure humidity). You are correct in that there are curves with temperature and their respective humidity recommendations.

    If outside temperature is 20 to 40 degrees, humidity indoors should not be more than 40 percent.

    • If outside temperature is 10 to 20 degrees, humidity indoors should not be more than 35 percent.

    • If outside temperature is 0 to 10 degrees, humidity indoors should not be more than 30 percent.

    • If outside temperature is 10-below to 0, humidity indoors should not be more than 25 percent.

    • If outside temperature is 20-below to 10-below, humidity indoors should not be more than 20 percent.

    • If outdoor temperature is lower than 20-below, inside humidity should not be more than 15 percent.

    Staying in the correct range and keeping the North facing windows frost free at these temps is nearly impossible but I can say my ecobee thermostat has helped. There are a couple settings in it where I can let it regulate humidity using my humidifier based on the efficiency of my windows and the temperature outside. I’d say from about 10F and up my windows are normally free of condensation. The exception is the big window in my master bedroom. It is on the second floor (generally higher humidity) and the shower is used daily (bathroom fan can’t keep up).


    Meant reading online someone suggested the humidity might be the cause and there are curves with suggested humidity per temperature. I think that is what you were showing above with the suggestions.

    #154155 Quote
    davescharfdavescharf
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    gopherguy06 wrote:


    davescharf wrote:


    gopherguy06 wrote:


    On a separate note, anyone ever been a landlord or dealt with the eviction process? Can you kick someone out for paying rent late?

    Our old townhouse had someone move in and the first month didn’t get the full month’s rent until 22nd of the month. Lease says due the 1st, late after the 5th. It is now January 30 and haven’t received the full rent with some still outstanding. My thought was if it ever gets to the next month, I would work to kick them out, but haven’t cared as long as I get the full rent by EOM despite being late (with a late fee).

    You should talk to a lawyer about this and be very formal about the process. If they’re already not paying the rent then you will consistently have this problem unless it was a circumstance like the guy being a federal employee.

    Evicting after one month seems pretty extreme (and I suspect illegal without some kind of due process) but you should talk to a professional about it.

    Third month of being late and that’s after fighting tooth and nail to get chase it. If he is late now, no reason to think he will suddenly be better. not ready to cut ties yet but exploring options or seeing if anyone has had to deal

    Ok – when I read your original question this sounded like month 1

    #154156 Quote
    gopherguy06gopherguy06
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    davescharf wrote:


    gopherguy06 wrote:


    davescharf wrote:


    gopherguy06 wrote:


    On a separate note, anyone ever been a landlord or dealt with the eviction process? Can you kick someone out for paying rent late?

    Our old townhouse had someone move in and the first month didn’t get the full month’s rent until 22nd of the month. Lease says due the 1st, late after the 5th. It is now January 30 and haven’t received the full rent with some still outstanding. My thought was if it ever gets to the next month, I would work to kick them out, but haven’t cared as long as I get the full rent by EOM despite being late (with a late fee).

    You should talk to a lawyer about this and be very formal about the process. If they’re already not paying the rent then you will consistently have this problem unless it was a circumstance like the guy being a federal employee.

    Evicting after one month seems pretty extreme (and I suspect illegal without some kind of due process) but you should talk to a professional about it.

    Third month of being late and that’s after fighting tooth and nail to get chase it. If he is late now, no reason to think he will suddenly be better. not ready to cut ties yet but exploring options or seeing if anyone has had to deal

    Ok – when I read your original question this sounded like month 1


    Lease started 11/1 and been late every month.

    #154157 Quote
    GO4GO4
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    gopherguy06 wrote:


    davescharf wrote:


    gopherguy06 wrote:


    davescharf wrote:


    gopherguy06 wrote:


    On a separate note, anyone ever been a landlord or dealt with the eviction process? Can you kick someone out for paying rent late?

    Our old townhouse had someone move in and the first month didn’t get the full month’s rent until 22nd of the month. Lease says due the 1st, late after the 5th. It is now January 30 and haven’t received the full rent with some still outstanding. My thought was if it ever gets to the next month, I would work to kick them out, but haven’t cared as long as I get the full rent by EOM despite being late (with a late fee).

    You should talk to a lawyer about this and be very formal about the process. If they’re already not paying the rent then you will consistently have this problem unless it was a circumstance like the guy being a federal employee.

    Evicting after one month seems pretty extreme (and I suspect illegal without some kind of due process) but you should talk to a professional about it.

    Third month of being late and that’s after fighting tooth and nail to get chase it. If he is late now, no reason to think he will suddenly be better. not ready to cut ties yet but exploring options or seeing if anyone has had to deal

    Ok – when I read your original question this sounded like month 1


    Lease started 11/1 and been late every month.


    My parents dealt with something along these lines but probably a bit worse. They had someone begin to skip payments and it took months to get rid of the deadbeats. Eviction is a long process and in my parent’s case they had to foot the bill for everything while the lessee walked away never paying a dime. I’d suggest acting on it early and like davescharf suggested be formal about it.

    Double check if you need a lawyer. My parents paid for one but ended up not needing one just to push paperwork. That definitely added to their frustration. :anger:

    #154158 Quote
    gopherguy06gopherguy06
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    Yeah, obviously want it to work out and not kick someone out, especially in the middle of winter, with 2 kids, but if they continue to be a problem, see ya!

    #154159 Quote
    Jane FondaJane Fonda
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    Burn the house down with them in it, collect insurance.

    #154160 Quote
    gopherguy06gopherguy06
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    Jane Fonda wrote:


    Burn the house down with them in it, collect insurance.

    :shock:

    That escalated quickly.

    #154161 Quote
    GopherPeteGopherPete
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    We had a sump pump failure and flooded basement last week. Now we are in the process of looking at replacement options for our old carpeting. We are thinking laminate or vinyl plank flooring. Any suggestions? Also, floor is concrete so will we need to install subfloor with either/both? Thanks

    #154162 Quote
    frozen4champsfrozen4champs
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    GopherPete wrote:


    We had a sump pump failure and flooded basement last week. Now we are in the process of looking at replacement options for our old carpeting. We are thinking laminate or vinyl plank flooring. Any suggestions? Also, floor is concrete so will we need to install subfloor with either/both? Thanks

    Sorry about the sump pump failure. For peace of mind, you may want to consider adding a second sump pump above your regular one. We built a new house last summer, and we added one that is hooked into the water line. It runs off the water pressure if the electricity goes out.

    #154163 Quote
    GopherPeteGopherPete
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    frozen4champs wrote:


    GopherPete wrote:


    We had a sump pump failure and flooded basement last week. Now we are in the process of looking at replacement options for our old carpeting. We are thinking laminate or vinyl plank flooring. Any suggestions? Also, floor is concrete so will we need to install subfloor with either/both? Thanks

    Sorry about the sump pump failure. For peace of mind, you may want to consider adding a second sump pump above your regular one. We built a new house last summer, and we added one that is hooked into the water line. It runs off the water pressure if the electricity goes out.

    Not a bad idea. It was actually a float switch malfunction (got stuck in bottom position and never activated pump) but has since been working just fine so I am planning to just replace the float switch.

    #154164 Quote
    GO4GO4
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    frozen4champs wrote:


    GopherPete wrote:


    We had a sump pump failure and flooded basement last week. Now we are in the process of looking at replacement options for our old carpeting. We are thinking laminate or vinyl plank flooring. Any suggestions? Also, floor is concrete so will we need to install subfloor with either/both? Thanks

    Sorry about the sump pump failure. For peace of mind, you may want to consider adding a second sump pump above your regular one. We built a new house last summer, and we added one that is hooked into the water line. It runs off the water pressure if the electricity goes out.


    Which manufacturer? I have been debating at basepump and another brand for the last month.

    Did you tie into the existing pumps exit pipe? Does it have to be inspected by the city?

    #154165 Quote
    frozen4champsfrozen4champs
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    GO4 wrote:


    frozen4champs wrote:


    GopherPete wrote:


    We had a sump pump failure and flooded basement last week. Now we are in the process of looking at replacement options for our old carpeting. We are thinking laminate or vinyl plank flooring. Any suggestions? Also, floor is concrete so will we need to install subfloor with either/both? Thanks

    Sorry about the sump pump failure. For peace of mind, you may want to consider adding a second sump pump above your regular one. We built a new house last summer, and we added one that is hooked into the water line. It runs off the water pressure if the electricity goes out.


    Which manufacturer? I have been debating at basepump and another brand for the last month.

    Did you tie into the existing pumps exit pipe? Does it have to be inspected by the city?

    It’s made by Liberty. It is positioned right above the normal pump, and it is tied into the same exit pipe with a t fitting. I live in the country, and it was not part of any inspection, but it may vary in other areas.. I had my plumber put it in. I was looking at a battery backup one, and he suggested this one.

    #154166 Quote
    georgegeorge
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    GopherPete wrote:


    frozen4champs wrote:


    GopherPete wrote:


    We had a sump pump failure and flooded basement last week. Now we are in the process of looking at replacement options for our old carpeting. We are thinking laminate or vinyl plank flooring. Any suggestions? Also, floor is concrete so will we need to install subfloor with either/both? Thanks

    Sorry about the sump pump failure. For peace of mind, you may want to consider adding a second sump pump above your regular one. We built a new house last summer, and we added one that is hooked into the water line. It runs off the water pressure if the electricity goes out.

    Not a bad idea. It was actually a float switch malfunction (got stuck in bottom position and never activated pump) but has since been working just fine so I am planning to just replace the float switch.

    I don’t know if it is available on residential pumps, but the commercial ones I specify have a secondary switch above the first one in case the first fails (there’s usually a third even higher to sound an alarm). Although a more secure arrangement is the second pump someone else suggested (our commercial ones often have that arrangement too – of course the worst failure we had was a flood from a different system that took out the electrical panel serving the whole thing, good thing the alarm worked!)

    #154167 Quote
    OrionOrion
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    frozen4champs wrote:


    GO4 wrote:


    frozen4champs wrote:


    GopherPete wrote:


    We had a sump pump failure and flooded basement last week. Now we are in the process of looking at replacement options for our old carpeting. We are thinking laminate or vinyl plank flooring. Any suggestions? Also, floor is concrete so will we need to install subfloor with either/both? Thanks

    Sorry about the sump pump failure. For peace of mind, you may want to consider adding a second sump pump above your regular one. We built a new house last summer, and we added one that is hooked into the water line. It runs off the water pressure if the electricity goes out.


    Which manufacturer? I have been debating at basepump and another brand for the last month.

    Did you tie into the existing pumps exit pipe? Does it have to be inspected by the city?

    It’s made by Liberty. It is positioned right above the normal pump, and it is tied into the same exit pipe with a t fitting. I live in the country, and it was not part of any inspection, but it may vary in other areas.. I had my plumber put it in. I was looking at a battery backup one, and he suggested this one.

    If you are on a well don’t you still need electricity to run the water pump?

    #154168 Quote
    frozen4champsfrozen4champs
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    Orion wrote:


    frozen4champs wrote:


    GO4 wrote:


    frozen4champs wrote:


    GopherPete wrote:


    We had a sump pump failure and flooded basement last week. Now we are in the process of looking at replacement options for our old carpeting. We are thinking laminate or vinyl plank flooring. Any suggestions? Also, floor is concrete so will we need to install subfloor with either/both? Thanks

    Sorry about the sump pump failure. For peace of mind, you may want to consider adding a second sump pump above your regular one. We built a new house last summer, and we added one that is hooked into the water line. It runs off the water pressure if the electricity goes out.


    Which manufacturer? I have been debating at basepump and another brand for the last month.

    Did you tie into the existing pumps exit pipe? Does it have to be inspected by the city?

    It’s made by Liberty. It is positioned right above the normal pump, and it is tied into the same exit pipe with a t fitting. I live in the country, and it was not part of any inspection, but it may vary in other areas.. I had my plumber put it in. I was looking at a battery backup one, and he suggested this one.

    If you are on a well don’t you still need electricity to run the water pump?


    I’m hooked up to a rural water system. It’s like being hooked up to a city system. I’m sure if I had a well system I would need the battery backup version.

    #154169 Quote
    BertogliatBertogliat
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    We had a sump pump failure shortly after moving into the new house. We paid for the system that has 2 pumps and 2 floats with alarm and battery back up.

    Not cheap but a flooded basement is awful. Insurance won’t cover it and you have to declare it when you sell the house.

    #154170 Quote
    GO4GO4
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    frozen4champs wrote:


    GO4 wrote:


    frozen4champs wrote:


    GopherPete wrote:


    We had a sump pump failure and flooded basement last week. Now we are in the process of looking at replacement options for our old carpeting. We are thinking laminate or vinyl plank flooring. Any suggestions? Also, floor is concrete so will we need to install subfloor with either/both? Thanks

    Sorry about the sump pump failure. For peace of mind, you may want to consider adding a second sump pump above your regular one. We built a new house last summer, and we added one that is hooked into the water line. It runs off the water pressure if the electricity goes out.


    Which manufacturer? I have been debating at basepump and another brand for the last month.

    Did you tie into the existing pumps exit pipe? Does it have to be inspected by the city?

    It’s made by Liberty. It is positioned right above the normal pump, and it is tied into the same exit pipe with a t fitting. I live in the country, and it was not part of any inspection, but it may vary in other areas.. I had my plumber put it in. I was looking at a battery backup one, and he suggested this one.

    Thanks!

    Yes, that is the one I will probably end up with as well. I used their little online calculator and figured it should have enough gpm based on the length of my run and my water pressure.

    If all else fails I have a smartthings water sensor down there that will send an alret to my phone and a text message to my wife.

    #154171 Quote
    BladepullerBladepuller
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    Plank will install right over concrete. I like it better than laminate and a water event is no the same.level of disaster as with laminate or “real wood”.

    Well pumps that are submersible are 220 / 230 v.

    That is what I have at ML. We have a jet pump, it sits in the basement, in “town” and it runs on 110 / 120 v. There is no comparison on the amount of water the submersible delivers vs. the jet pump. A sump pump is totally different from a well pump. There is difference in pressure, volume, etc.

    It is illegal to discharge a sump system into a municipal waste water system. There is no sense treating surface water as waste water.

    #154172 Quote
    NYC Gopher fanNYC Gopher fan
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    Got my sump issue fixed today. Needed a few sections of pipe replaced and re routed my water softener hose elsewhere. Guy said it should never have been draining into pump basin and previous owners were lazy and sloppy.

    Now need to get battery backup system installed before April. I’ve gotten two quotes , both for $1700 all in.

    Does that seem reasonable? Standard water makes their own and installs that. Guy out today said they will use Liberty product.

    Other Places have said I could buy my own system and pay them for labor to install

    #154173 Quote
    frozen4champsfrozen4champs
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    NYC Gopher fan wrote:


    Got my sump issue fixed today. Needed a few sections of pipe replaced and re routed my water softener hose elsewhere. Guy said it should never have been draining into pump basin and previous owners were lazy and sloppy.

    Now need to get battery backup system installed before April. I’ve gotten two quotes , both for $1700 all in.

    Does that seem reasonable? Standard water makes their own and installs that. Guy out today said they will use Liberty product.

    Other Places have said I could buy my own system and pay them for labor to install

    IIRC, my Liberty was installed for around $500 or less. I may be off though. I’m in the Cities for Gopher games, so I will look at my bill when I get home on Sunday and let you know. I may have got a deal on labor, as they did all my plumbing and heating for the new house.

    #154174 Quote
    frozen4champsfrozen4champs
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    frozen4champs wrote:


    NYC Gopher fan wrote:


    Got my sump issue fixed today. Needed a few sections of pipe replaced and re routed my water softener hose elsewhere. Guy said it should never have been draining into pump basin and previous owners were lazy and sloppy.

    Now need to get battery backup system installed before April. I’ve gotten two quotes , both for $1700 all in.

    Does that seem reasonable? Standard water makes their own and installs that. Guy out today said they will use Liberty product.

    Other Places have said I could buy my own system and pay them for labor to install

    IIRC, my Liberty was installed for around $500 or less. I may be off though. I’m in the Cities for Gopher games, so I will look at my bill when I get home on Sunday and let you know. I may have got a deal on labor, as they did all my plumbing and heating for the new house.

    The cost of my Liberty Jet backup sump pump that is run of my water pressure was under $475 installed. Bought it through my plumbing company and they installed it. Looks like it was a couple of hours of labor and not that much in materials other than the pump. I would guess the cost of materials would depend on how easy and far it would be to install to your current water line. Mine was a breeze and only a few feet to the water source. Hope this helps.

    #154175 Quote
    OrionOrion
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    To be fair, replacing a sump pump is one of the easiest dyi projects out there. I bought a battery backup here.

    http://www.sumppumpsdirect.com

    #154176 Quote
    davescharfdavescharf
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    Maybe one of you can help me. I came home yesterday to water dripping out of our bathroom fan yesterday. We turned on the fan and it would stop but once we shut it off it would drip.

    I don’t see any other water damage but it seemed like a slow and steady drip for awhile. It did eventually stop last night, so I’m wondering if it was just a lot of condensation from the weather changes or if it os possibly a bigger problem. I did crawl up into my attic and didn’t really see anything that looked wet or problematic, but I’ll also be the first to admit I wasn’t sure what I needed to look for besides moisture.

    #154177 Quote
    GO4GO4
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    So there is nothing above the bathroom? Just attic space? Did you look at the roof?

    #154178 Quote
    davescharfdavescharf
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    GO4 wrote:


    So there is nothing above the bathroom? Just attic space? Did you look at the roof?

    Just attic space. I didn’t get out onto the roof because I can’t get a ladder out there safely and it’s at the highest point of our two story house.

    #154179 Quote
    JWGJWG
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    Ok, anyone with a new home that has an air exchanger:

    During the winter the intake vent piping for our air exchanger, and even our passive air vent in the extreme cold, causes such bad condensation that the insulation around the venting saturates and drips. For context, the vent pipe is that flex piping with about 2″ of fiberglass insulations around it and covered with that black plastic.

    So, the cold air comes in and the warm house air causes such condensation that the insulation around the vent piping saturates roughly 3 feet into the house and water drips. It’s not a huge deal now because we have an unfinished basement but two issues:

    – That insulation is so wet it will never dry – will probably mold

    – If we were to finish our basement that would be dripping onto a finished ceiling causing damage

    We’ve already had the vent pipe replaced once because it happened last winter (new home we just moved into last year).

    Thoughts on how to resolve? I’ve thought about adding more insulation between those floor joists the vent runs along to keep the warmer basement air off. But I’m getting annoyed.

    #154180 Quote
    dryflydryfly
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    JWG wrote:


    Ok, anyone with a new home that has an air exchanger:

    During the winter the intake vent piping for our air exchanger, and even our passive air vent in the extreme cold, causes such bad condensation that the insulation around the venting saturates and drips. For context, the vent pipe is that flex piping with about 2″ of fiberglass insulations around it and covered with that black plastic.

    So, the cold air comes in and the warm house air causes such condensation that the insulation around the vent piping saturates roughly 3 feet into the house and water drips. It’s not a huge deal now because we have an unfinished basement but two issues:

    – That insulation is so wet it will never dry – will probably mold

    – If we were to finish our basement that would be dripping onto a finished ceiling causing damage

    We’ve already had the vent pipe replaced once because it happened last winter (new home we just moved into last year).

    Thoughts on how to resolve? I’ve thought about adding more insulation between those floor joists the vent runs along to keep the warmer basement air off. But I’m getting annoyed.


    You can try more insulation but it has to be wrapped really ‘tight’ – I don’t mean physically tight but sealed off tight so warm moist air in the house doesn’t contact cold surfaces inside the insulation. If the air leaking in comes in contact with any surface colder than the dew point of that air – it condenses. The problem then accelerates because wet insulation doesn’t insulate well – so that cold surface gets colder and the area larger. It only takes a small air leak for this to take off.

    People think adding insulation is a savior – it isn’t necessarily if moist air is infiltrating the insulation and condensing – in some cases even freezing in there if the inner outer temp gradient is large enough.

    BTW this same thing can be going on inside your walls – it’s a major cause of mold in poorly sealed homes.

    You can try more insulation but I think you will need to really wrap it well so moist air doesn’t infiltrate into the insulation. If it does it will find the coolest surfaces and condense out to beat hell.

    The other option is lower the humidity in your home during really cold periods. Maybe a lot lower. If the inner part of insulation closest to the outside air reaches a temperature of say … 40 degrees… you won’t have condensation if the dew point of air inside is home is lower than that. But understand – 70 deg air with a dew point of say 35 degrees is REALLY dry. Wood splitting nosebleed dry. That’s my home almost all winter.

    Love to hear what others experience.

    #154181 Quote
    JWGJWG
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    Yea, we let the humidity inside fall to 20% last week, that shouldn’t of impacted anything. It’s just the stupid air exchanger venting we can’t seem to get a tight enough wrap on. Really annoyed.

    #154182 Quote
    georgegeorge
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    davescharf wrote:


    Maybe one of you can help me. I came home yesterday to water dripping out of our bathroom fan yesterday. We turned on the fan and it would stop but once we shut it off it would drip.

    I don’t see any other water damage but it seemed like a slow and steady drip for awhile. It did eventually stop last night, so I’m wondering if it was just a lot of condensation from the weather changes or if it os possibly a bigger problem. I did crawl up into my attic and didn’t really see anything that looked wet or problematic, but I’ll also be the first to admit I wasn’t sure what I needed to look for besides moisture.

    I strongly believe that it’s frozen condensation thawing out and nothing more. If there is a gravity backdraft damper somewhere in the exhaust path, it may have frozen shut during the freeze. My next door neighbor had that happen. If it did, then all the humid air you were trying to vent just accumulated and the moisture froze somewhere in the duct.

    #154183 Quote
    dryflydryfly
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    JWG wrote:


    Yea, we let the humidity inside fall to 20% last week, that shouldn’t of impacted anything. It’s just the stupid air exchanger venting we can’t seem to get a tight enough wrap on. Really annoyed.


    I just checked on a psychometric chart for a hypothetical…

    If the air in the house is 68 degF and a dry 20% RH … it still ‘condenses’ as frost at 26 degF. So one would expect 68 degF 20% RH would be dry enough – it might not be if it’s 20 below outside and you are pulling that cold air in to ‘exchange’. Any surface cooled by that very cold outside air and coming in contact with moist inside air will have the potential to at least form condensate and maybe even ice up. Then melt and drip all over when temps warm up outside.

    You might want to invest in one of those IR thermal temp guns. You just point at stuff and it tells you it’s temp. Won’t work on surfaces buried under layers of insulation but will give you ideas of where the cold spots are.

    #154184 Quote
    NYC Gopher fanNYC Gopher fan
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    Orion wrote:


    To be fair, replacing a sump pump is one of the easiest dyi projects out there. I bought a battery backup here.

    http://www.sumppumpsdirect.com

    As someone who just isn’t handy, I don’t trust myself to hook this up alone.

    I still find it dubious it needs to cost $1700 but two places have quoted me that (including one who didn’t even see my setup- that’s just the flat rate that Standard Water charges). Roto rooter has same quote after fixing my pump yesterday- said they need to redo some of the work they did yesterday to properly install the liberty unit. Something about moving a pipe.

    #154185 Quote
    dryflydryfly
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    george wrote:


    davescharf wrote:


    Maybe one of you can help me. I came home yesterday to water dripping out of our bathroom fan yesterday. We turned on the fan and it would stop but once we shut it off it would drip.

    I don’t see any other water damage but it seemed like a slow and steady drip for awhile. It did eventually stop last night, so I’m wondering if it was just a lot of condensation from the weather changes or if it os possibly a bigger problem. I did crawl up into my attic and didn’t really see anything that looked wet or problematic, but I’ll also be the first to admit I wasn’t sure what I needed to look for besides moisture.

    I strongly believe that it’s frozen condensation thawing out and nothing more. If there is a gravity backdraft damper somewhere in the exhaust path, it may have frozen shut during the freeze. My next door neighbor had that happen. If it did, then all the humid air you were trying to vent just accumulated and the moisture froze somewhere in the duct.


    Two thoughts. If the moisture is coming from an exhaust vent (inside going out) then – yes what you suggest is probably correct.

    If the moisture is forming on the inlet air make up side then its just plain cold surfaces coming in contact with moist air inside the home and condensing on them.

    It should be fairly easy to determine which one it is. How you permanently fix? I don’t know. My answer is to have a drafty house and very dry air but I am primitive.

    #154186 Quote
    BertogliatBertogliat
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    NYC Gopher fan wrote:


    Orion wrote:


    To be fair, replacing a sump pump is one of the easiest dyi projects out there. I bought a battery backup here.

    http://www.sumppumpsdirect.com

    As someone who just isn’t handy, I don’t trust myself to hook this up alone.

    I still find it dubious it needs to cost $1700 but two places have quoted me that (including one who didn’t even see my setup- that’s just the flat rate that Standard Water charges). Roto rooter has same quote after fixing my pump yesterday- said they need to redo some of the work they did yesterday to properly install the liberty unit. Something about moving a pipe.

    I paid more than $1700 for mine. Quite a bit more. But it was has 2 pump set at different levels. Each has 2 floats. And it comes with a battery back up system (with alarm).

    I was also an emergency call which hiked the price.

    Point is, if you get the Mac Daddy set up, I think you have a fair quote.

    #154187 Quote
    HandyNotDanHandyNotDan
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    NYC Gopher fan wrote:


    Orion wrote:


    To be fair, replacing a sump pump is one of the easiest dyi projects out there. I bought a battery backup here.

    http://www.sumppumpsdirect.com

    As someone who just isn’t handy, I don’t trust myself to hook this up alone.

    I still find it dubious it needs to cost $1700 but two places have quoted me that (including one who didn’t even see my setup- that’s just the flat rate that Standard Water charges). Roto rooter has same quote after fixing my pump yesterday- said they need to redo some of the work they did yesterday to properly install the liberty unit. Something about moving a pipe.

    I replaced the one in our home (though I am technically Handy…not handy though ;) ) but it was a smaller unit that was rather easy to remove.

    #154188 Quote
    NYC Gopher fanNYC Gopher fan
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    Handyman wrote:


    NYC Gopher fan wrote:


    Orion wrote:


    To be fair, replacing a sump pump is one of the easiest dyi projects out there. I bought a battery backup here.

    http://www.sumppumpsdirect.com

    As someone who just isn’t handy, I don’t trust myself to hook this up alone.

    I still find it dubious it needs to cost $1700 but two places have quoted me that (including one who didn’t even see my setup- that’s just the flat rate that Standard Water charges). Roto rooter has same quote after fixing my pump yesterday- said they need to redo some of the work they did yesterday to properly install the liberty unit. Something about moving a pipe.

    I replaced the one in our home (though I am technically Handy…not handy though ;) ) but it was a smaller unit that was rather easy to remove.


    You’re hired!

    #154189 Quote
    georgegeorge
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    Had a new one this morning. My garage door froze solidly to the floor. Went out to get the car ready for my wife and door would not go up. Finally freed it with salt and cycling the opener enough. Left it up and added more salt. In a little while I’ll go scrape it clear. I’ve had a little icing before, but never anything this solid. My apron is pretty flat and between melt and drizzle had plenty of water lying there to freeze it in.

    #154190 Quote
    CowgirlCowgirl
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    george wrote:


    Had a new one this morning. My garage door froze solidly to the floor. Went out to get the car ready for my wife and door would not go up. Finally freed it with salt and cycling the opener enough. Left it up and added more salt. In a little while I’ll go scrape it clear. I’ve had a little icing before, but never anything this solid. My apron is pretty flat and between melt and drizzle had plenty of water lying there to freeze it in.

    That happened to me last week. Lots of kicking ensued.

    Haven’t tried to open the door yet today….our garage doesn’t drain well and lots of water pools behind the car and under the door.

    #154191 Quote
    dryflydryfly
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    You know it’s bad when your wheels are frozen in ice. That happened to a friend of mine in the past and I mean really stuck.

    We don’t get many awful ice storms here but farther south oh boy. I drove through Iowa once after a vicious ice storm and it looked like the place had been hit by an artillery barrage. Just about every branch on every tree shattered … plus everything coated with about a half inch of ice. I’ll take snow and cold thank you very much.

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