Portal Forum General General Discussion Home Ownership

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  • #153842 Quote
    fightclub30fightclub30
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    @g-manpuck wrote:

    My Dad was a contractor and was the general for a couple whole house builds during his years in business otherwise he stuck to remodeling mainly. In those couple builds though he strongly encouraged the homeowners to go to an architect to have the house drawn up professionally and get the layout nailed down. Once the boots hit the ground that main drawing wouldn’t change greatly only the small details. It helped alleviate numerous issues and problems that could delay a build using a builder off of some “plans” that they have to choose from.

    Also I agree that the amount of corner cutting to proper installation of just about anything is staggering just in the name of time and getting it done. Hell I had a fight on my hands over the holidays when I went to Iowa a couple weekends to help my in-laws on some remodeling in their house. It can either be done or done right and a lot of times done right may cost more in money or it may cost more in time….but anything is possible if you are willing to spend the money and the time.

    I try to inform my clients that they can pick 2 things from this list; cheap, quick, and correct. Quick and correct is the most expensive, cheap and correct takes a long time but can work if you have time, and cheap and quick is, well, just that, cheap and quick. All 3 cannot exist together, at least I haven’t seen it (except on HGTV with fake numbers, fake labor, subsidized costs, and editing…).

    Also, the truth is I can draw it correctly and have everything on paper, that does not always mean it gets installed/built that way. A real, knowledgeable GC who is on-site is SO helpful, but too many builders either lack one or have a guy over-seeing 5+ different projects and cannot keep an eye on everything/everyone involved. In fact the GC themselves is rarely the problem, it is almost always the “low-bid” laborers who “didn’t bid it that way” or “always do things this way and never have a problem.” I try to schedule site visits for my projects at critical times to make sure things are done right. I also cannot see everything, but I am able to catch things before it gets too late to fix.

    It isn’t just builders either, I have helped a few friends remodel their house and sadly hear things like “oh, that… yeah… that’s the next owner’s problem, not mine.” :anger:

    #153843 Quote
    BeaunerBeauner
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    If I’m buying a house that is listed as a homestead do I have to re-homestead the house when I buy it? If so, where do I need to go, what do I need, etc.

    #153844 Quote
    MNNavyMNNavy
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    @Beauner wrote:

    If I’m buying a house that is listed as a homestead do I have to re-homestead the house when I buy it? If so, where do I need to go, what do I need, etc.

    Yes, you have to apply to have the homestead credit registered in your name. As I recall, when we bought our house, the realtor (or the closing company, I don’t recall which) had the necessary paperwork ready for us at the closing. All we had to do was sign it and submit the application to the county.

    I’m sure if you Google it, you’ll find a county website with all of the information you need. For example, I Googled “Dakota County Homestead”, and the very first link contained all of the necessary information. Dakota county even lets you apply online (that wasn’t an option 3 1/2 years ago).

    #153845 Quote
    eHoeHo
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    @GO4 wrote:

    Anyone ever go through the process of building a new house? We are starting discussions to build with Capstone Homes so any feedback on the builder themselves, questions or concerns to bring to the table about the process, etc. would be greatly appreciated. Feel free to PM if you don’t want to air any dirty laundry in public. :)

    Our house is a Capstone home. We’re the second owners so I can’t say how they were during the building process, but there are definitely some items in our house that we noticed we’re done in the cheap (light fixtures, windows aren’t that great, and I think they may have mixed up the hot/cold water line to the washer (2nd floor laundry room)). In talking with our neighbors who are original owners, most said they definitely went on the cheap for materials.

    #153846 Quote
    MaizeMaize
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    @MNNavy wrote:

    @Beauner wrote:

    If I’m buying a house that is listed as a homestead do I have to re-homestead the house when I buy it? If so, where do I need to go, what do I need, etc.

    Yes, you have to apply to have the homestead credit registered in your name. As I recall, when we bought our house, the realtor (or the closing company, I don’t recall which) had the necessary paperwork ready for us at the closing. All we had to do was sign it and submit the application to the county.

    Yes, your realtor should have the paperwork at closing. Sign it and drop it off at the county courthouse and you’re good to go.

    #153847 Quote
    Don Adam's Wheel of JusticeDon Adam’s Wheel of Justice
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    @Maize wrote:

    @MNNavy wrote:

    @Beauner wrote:

    If I’m buying a house that is listed as a homestead do I have to re-homestead the house when I buy it? If so, where do I need to go, what do I need, etc.

    Yes, you have to apply to have the homestead credit registered in your name. As I recall, when we bought our house, the realtor (or the closing company, I don’t recall which) had the necessary paperwork ready for us at the closing. All we had to do was sign it and submit the application to the county.

    Yes, your realtor should have the paperwork at closing. Sign it and drop it off at the county courthouse and you’re good to go.

    When you go to the courthouse, they’ll ask you if you live at the property so tell them yes. If you say, “we’re moving in next Monday”, they’ll tell you to come back on Monday.

    #153848 Quote
    BeaunerBeauner
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    How hard is it to install a water softener? It’s pretty clear that the previous owner had one in at some point, as there is some copper piping looped around to nothing and there is a clear difference in color on the floor, as though something was sitting on the floor for an extended period of time.

    Is it something I’ll need expert knowledge to do (in which case something I’d be better off paying somebody to do)?

    #153849 Quote
    davescharfdavescharf
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    @Beauner wrote:

    How hard is it to install a water softener? It’s pretty clear that the previous owner had one in at some point, as there is some copper piping looped around to nothing and there is a clear difference in color on the floor, as though something was sitting on the floor for an extended period of time.

    Is it something I’ll need expert knowledge to do (in which case something I’d be better off paying somebody to do)?

    That didn’t take long to find a bigger issue :wink:

    No, water softeners aren’t hard to install at all. The biggest issues are getting the water main shut off (my neighbors hadn’t been shut off in years and the shutoff valve broke when he went to do his) and transporting the softener.

    If you buy one the install cost may not be more than $100 – $200 more. Given my ability of fixing things like that I find that cost very much worth letting the professionals do it, but if you have a handy friend and enough beer you can save some money.

    #153850 Quote
    BeaunerBeauner
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    @davescharf wrote:

    @Beauner wrote:

    How hard is it to install a water softener? It’s pretty clear that the previous owner had one in at some point, as there is some copper piping looped around to nothing and there is a clear difference in color on the floor, as though something was sitting on the floor for an extended period of time.

    Is it something I’ll need expert knowledge to do (in which case something I’d be better off paying somebody to do)?

    That didn’t take long to find a bigger issue :wink:

    No, water softeners aren’t hard to install at all. The biggest issues are getting the water main shut off (my neighbors hadn’t been shut off in years and the shutoff valve broke when he went to do his) and transporting the softener.

    If you buy one the install cost may not be more than $100 – $200 more. Given my ability of fixing things like that I find that cost very much worth letting the professionals do it, but if you have a handy friend and enough beer you can save some money.

    I knew ahead of time that it didn’t have one :lol: Just hadn’t really thought about doing it before. I’m still not sure if I’m going to buy one, just wondering how much it would cost, budget wise.
    I’ve never lived in a house without a water softener so I dunno what “hard water” does. :lol:

    I haven’t even moved in yet, officially. Decided I’m going to paint and put in new floors/carpet in the rooms I want floors/new carpet in before I move in so I don’t have to move furniture twice.

    #153851 Quote
    OrionOrion
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    @Beauner wrote:

    @davescharf wrote:

    @Beauner wrote:

    How hard is it to install a water softener? It’s pretty clear that the previous owner had one in at some point, as there is some copper piping looped around to nothing and there is a clear difference in color on the floor, as though something was sitting on the floor for an extended period of time.

    Is it something I’ll need expert knowledge to do (in which case something I’d be better off paying somebody to do)?

    That didn’t take long to find a bigger issue :wink:

    No, water softeners aren’t hard to install at all. The biggest issues are getting the water main shut off (my neighbors hadn’t been shut off in years and the shutoff valve broke when he went to do his) and transporting the softener.

    If you buy one the install cost may not be more than $100 – $200 more. Given my ability of fixing things like that I find that cost very much worth letting the professionals do it, but if you have a handy friend and enough beer you can save some money.

    I knew ahead of time that it didn’t have one :lol: Just hadn’t really thought about doing it before. I’m still not sure if I’m going to buy one, just wondering how much it would cost, budget wise.
    I’ve never lived in a house without a water softener so I dunno what “hard water” does. :lol:

    I haven’t even moved in yet, officially. Decided I’m going to paint and put in new floors/carpet in the rooms I want floors/new carpet in before I move in so I don’t have to move furniture twice.

    Check to make sure your city doesn’t soften the water. Many cities in the metro treat the water and make a softener unnecessary now

    #153852 Quote
    CowgirlCowgirl
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    @Beauner wrote:

    @davescharf wrote:

    @Beauner wrote:

    How hard is it to install a water softener? It’s pretty clear that the previous owner had one in at some point, as there is some copper piping looped around to nothing and there is a clear difference in color on the floor, as though something was sitting on the floor for an extended period of time.

    Is it something I’ll need expert knowledge to do (in which case something I’d be better off paying somebody to do)?

    That didn’t take long to find a bigger issue :wink:

    No, water softeners aren’t hard to install at all. The biggest issues are getting the water main shut off (my neighbors hadn’t been shut off in years and the shutoff valve broke when he went to do his) and transporting the softener.

    If you buy one the install cost may not be more than $100 – $200 more. Given my ability of fixing things like that I find that cost very much worth letting the professionals do it, but if you have a handy friend and enough beer you can save some money.

    I knew ahead of time that it didn’t have one :lol: Just hadn’t really thought about doing it before. I’m still not sure if I’m going to buy one, just wondering how much it would cost, budget wise.
    I’ve never lived in a house without a water softener so I dunno what “hard water” does. :lol:

    I haven’t even moved in yet, officially. Decided I’m going to paint and put in new floors/carpet in the rooms I want floors/new carpet in before I move in so I don’t have to move furniture twice.

    Laundry, dishes, and showers are usually a lot nicer with softened water. Do you still live in the AV area? With the amount of crap in our water you might need it!
    And good call on the paint and carpet first – I always do that. Unless cost to do it right away is an issue it sure seems like a no-brainer to me.

    #153853 Quote
    davescharfdavescharf
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    @Beauner wrote:

    @davescharf wrote:

    @Beauner wrote:

    How hard is it to install a water softener? It’s pretty clear that the previous owner had one in at some point, as there is some copper piping looped around to nothing and there is a clear difference in color on the floor, as though something was sitting on the floor for an extended period of time.

    Is it something I’ll need expert knowledge to do (in which case something I’d be better off paying somebody to do)?

    That didn’t take long to find a bigger issue :wink:

    No, water softeners aren’t hard to install at all. The biggest issues are getting the water main shut off (my neighbors hadn’t been shut off in years and the shutoff valve broke when he went to do his) and transporting the softener.

    If you buy one the install cost may not be more than $100 – $200 more. Given my ability of fixing things like that I find that cost very much worth letting the professionals do it, but if you have a handy friend and enough beer you can save some money.

    I knew ahead of time that it didn’t have one :lol: Just hadn’t really thought about doing it before. I’m still not sure if I’m going to buy one, just wondering how much it would cost, budget wise.
    I’ve never lived in a house without a water softener so I dunno what “hard water” does. :lol:

    I haven’t even moved in yet, officially. Decided I’m going to paint and put in new floors/carpet in the rooms I want floors/new carpet in before I move in so I don’t have to move furniture twice.

    As Cowgirl said check with the City. I live on the east side of Plymouth and the water here (along with Maple Grove) is some of the hardest in the metro. If you go two miles east to New Hope there’s no need for a softener at all. My word of advice is that if you do need a softener to not buy the cheapest one you find…get a mid-tier one because it will last longer. I’ve been in my house 11+ years and I’ve had to replace mine twice already.

    The worst thing I’ve found with hard water is the stains on your dishes and glasses. It’s just gross.

    #153518 Quote
    BeaunerBeauner
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    @Cowgirl wrote:

    @Beauner wrote:

    @davescharf wrote:

    @Beauner wrote:

    How hard is it to install a water softener? It’s pretty clear that the previous owner had one in at some point, as there is some copper piping looped around to nothing and there is a clear difference in color on the floor, as though something was sitting on the floor for an extended period of time.

    Is it something I’ll need expert knowledge to do (in which case something I’d be better off paying somebody to do)?

    That didn’t take long to find a bigger issue :wink:

    No, water softeners aren’t hard to install at all. The biggest issues are getting the water main shut off (my neighbors hadn’t been shut off in years and the shutoff valve broke when he went to do his) and transporting the softener.

    If you buy one the install cost may not be more than $100 – $200 more. Given my ability of fixing things like that I find that cost very much worth letting the professionals do it, but if you have a handy friend and enough beer you can save some money.

    I knew ahead of time that it didn’t have one :lol: Just hadn’t really thought about doing it before. I’m still not sure if I’m going to buy one, just wondering how much it would cost, budget wise.
    I’ve never lived in a house without a water softener so I dunno what “hard water” does. :lol:

    I haven’t even moved in yet, officially. Decided I’m going to paint and put in new floors/carpet in the rooms I want floors/new carpet in before I move in so I don’t have to move furniture twice.

    Laundry, dishes, and showers are usually a lot nicer with softened water. Do you still live in the AV area? With the amount of crap in our water you might need it!
    And good call on the paint and carpet first – I always do that. Unless cost to do it right away is an issue it sure seems like a no-brainer to me.

    Yeah, just moved to Eagan and the water hardness scale is pretty much the same as Apple Valley (both are listed at 17 gpg on the last data I was able to find).

    #153854 Quote
    davescharfdavescharf
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    @Beauner wrote:

    @Cowgirl wrote:

    @Beauner wrote:

    @davescharf wrote:

    @Beauner wrote:

    How hard is it to install a water softener? It’s pretty clear that the previous owner had one in at some point, as there is some copper piping looped around to nothing and there is a clear difference in color on the floor, as though something was sitting on the floor for an extended period of time.

    Is it something I’ll need expert knowledge to do (in which case something I’d be better off paying somebody to do)?

    That didn’t take long to find a bigger issue :wink:

    No, water softeners aren’t hard to install at all. The biggest issues are getting the water main shut off (my neighbors hadn’t been shut off in years and the shutoff valve broke when he went to do his) and transporting the softener.

    If you buy one the install cost may not be more than $100 – $200 more. Given my ability of fixing things like that I find that cost very much worth letting the professionals do it, but if you have a handy friend and enough beer you can save some money.

    I knew ahead of time that it didn’t have one :lol: Just hadn’t really thought about doing it before. I’m still not sure if I’m going to buy one, just wondering how much it would cost, budget wise.
    I’ve never lived in a house without a water softener so I dunno what “hard water” does. :lol:

    I haven’t even moved in yet, officially. Decided I’m going to paint and put in new floors/carpet in the rooms I want floors/new carpet in before I move in so I don’t have to move furniture twice.

    Laundry, dishes, and showers are usually a lot nicer with softened water. Do you still live in the AV area? With the amount of crap in our water you might need it!
    And good call on the paint and carpet first – I always do that. Unless cost to do it right away is an issue it sure seems like a no-brainer to me.

    Yeah, just moved to Eagan and the water hardness scale is pretty much the same as Apple Valley (both are listed at 17 gpg on the last data I was able to find).

    Plymouth is a 24 :shock:

    The guy who installed my last one said you should have a softener at anything over 10 in his opinion

    #153855 Quote
    BeaunerBeauner
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    @davescharf wrote:

    @Beauner wrote:

    @Cowgirl wrote:

    @Beauner wrote:

    @davescharf wrote:

    @Beauner wrote:

    How hard is it to install a water softener? It’s pretty clear that the previous owner had one in at some point, as there is some copper piping looped around to nothing and there is a clear difference in color on the floor, as though something was sitting on the floor for an extended period of time.

    Is it something I’ll need expert knowledge to do (in which case something I’d be better off paying somebody to do)?

    That didn’t take long to find a bigger issue :wink:

    No, water softeners aren’t hard to install at all. The biggest issues are getting the water main shut off (my neighbors hadn’t been shut off in years and the shutoff valve broke when he went to do his) and transporting the softener.

    If you buy one the install cost may not be more than $100 – $200 more. Given my ability of fixing things like that I find that cost very much worth letting the professionals do it, but if you have a handy friend and enough beer you can save some money.

    I knew ahead of time that it didn’t have one :lol: Just hadn’t really thought about doing it before. I’m still not sure if I’m going to buy one, just wondering how much it would cost, budget wise.
    I’ve never lived in a house without a water softener so I dunno what “hard water” does. :lol:

    I haven’t even moved in yet, officially. Decided I’m going to paint and put in new floors/carpet in the rooms I want floors/new carpet in before I move in so I don’t have to move furniture twice.

    Laundry, dishes, and showers are usually a lot nicer with softened water. Do you still live in the AV area? With the amount of crap in our water you might need it!
    And good call on the paint and carpet first – I always do that. Unless cost to do it right away is an issue it sure seems like a no-brainer to me.

    Yeah, just moved to Eagan and the water hardness scale is pretty much the same as Apple Valley (both are listed at 17 gpg on the last data I was able to find).

    Plymouth is a 24 :shock:

    The guy who installed my last one said you should have a softener at anything over 10 in his opinion

    That matches what I’ve seen too.

    #153856 Quote
    BertogliatBertogliat
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    Bauner, I had to replace the softener in my first home about a year after we moved in. It can be a pain in the arse as you’ll likely have to solder (use map gas) a slowly draining wet pipe. And there will likely be a metal to plastic connection so you’ll have to make sure you do things in the correct order.

    The biggest problem we ran into was the connections to the new softener were wider than the distance between the pipes that ran to the original softener. So there was some extra work to slightly move the pipes.

    And in my old house the pipes were tight to the cinder block wall making the extended heating of the wet pipes interesting.

    #153857 Quote
    dryflydryfly
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    @Beauner wrote:

    @davescharf wrote:

    @Beauner wrote:

    @Cowgirl wrote:

    @Beauner wrote:

    @davescharf wrote:

    @Beauner wrote:

    How hard is it to install a water softener? It’s pretty clear that the previous owner had one in at some point, as there is some copper piping looped around to nothing and there is a clear difference in color on the floor, as though something was sitting on the floor for an extended period of time.

    Is it something I’ll need expert knowledge to do (in which case something I’d be better off paying somebody to do)?

    That didn’t take long to find a bigger issue :wink:

    No, water softeners aren’t hard to install at all. The biggest issues are getting the water main shut off (my neighbors hadn’t been shut off in years and the shutoff valve broke when he went to do his) and transporting the softener.

    If you buy one the install cost may not be more than $100 – $200 more. Given my ability of fixing things like that I find that cost very much worth letting the professionals do it, but if you have a handy friend and enough beer you can save some money.

    I knew ahead of time that it didn’t have one :lol: Just hadn’t really thought about doing it before. I’m still not sure if I’m going to buy one, just wondering how much it would cost, budget wise.
    I’ve never lived in a house without a water softener so I dunno what “hard water” does. :lol:

    I haven’t even moved in yet, officially. Decided I’m going to paint and put in new floors/carpet in the rooms I want floors/new carpet in before I move in so I don’t have to move furniture twice.

    Laundry, dishes, and showers are usually a lot nicer with softened water. Do you still live in the AV area? With the amount of crap in our water you might need it!
    And good call on the paint and carpet first – I always do that. Unless cost to do it right away is an issue it sure seems like a no-brainer to me.

    Yeah, just moved to Eagan and the water hardness scale is pretty much the same as Apple Valley (both are listed at 17 gpg on the last data I was able to find).

    Plymouth is a 24 :shock:

    The guy who installed my last one said you should have a softener at anything over 10 in his opinion

    That matches what I’ve seen too.

    24 gpg is insainly hard. That is over 400 ppm which is about the maximum possible and still be called ‘freshwater’. Your water must be coming from a well pulling from a limestone formation (no surface water mixed in at all) to be that hard. Here I think we have about 40:60 surface and well water and it’s 17 gpg. Even that is high at around 290 ppm. It will destroy a water heater in about 5 years without a high capacity softener. I can’t imagine what 24 gpg will do.

    #153858 Quote
    MNGophers29MNGophers29
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    If you are doing a small plumbing project with little experience, use SharkBite fittings. You can use them on PVC, copper, etc. You push the fitting on and you are done. I have done a lot of plumbing work I previously wouldn’t have even tried had my only option been to sweat pipe.

    They are a little more money than regular fittings, but well worth it in the end.

    #153859 Quote
    VikingViking
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    @Beauner wrote:

    @Cowgirl wrote:

    @Beauner wrote:

    @davescharf wrote:

    @Beauner wrote:

    How hard is it to install a water softener? It’s pretty clear that the previous owner had one in at some point, as there is some copper piping looped around to nothing and there is a clear difference in color on the floor, as though something was sitting on the floor for an extended period of time.

    Is it something I’ll need expert knowledge to do (in which case something I’d be better off paying somebody to do)?

    That didn’t take long to find a bigger issue :wink:

    No, water softeners aren’t hard to install at all. The biggest issues are getting the water main shut off (my neighbors hadn’t been shut off in years and the shutoff valve broke when he went to do his) and transporting the softener.

    If you buy one the install cost may not be more than $100 – $200 more. Given my ability of fixing things like that I find that cost very much worth letting the professionals do it, but if you have a handy friend and enough beer you can save some money.

    I knew ahead of time that it didn’t have one :lol: Just hadn’t really thought about doing it before. I’m still not sure if I’m going to buy one, just wondering how much it would cost, budget wise.
    I’ve never lived in a house without a water softener so I dunno what “hard water” does. :lol:

    I haven’t even moved in yet, officially. Decided I’m going to paint and put in new floors/carpet in the rooms I want floors/new carpet in before I move in so I don’t have to move furniture twice.

    Laundry, dishes, and showers are usually a lot nicer with softened water. Do you still live in the AV area? With the amount of crap in our water you might need it!
    And good call on the paint and carpet first – I always do that. Unless cost to do it right away is an issue it sure seems like a no-brainer to me.

    Yeah, just moved to Eagan and the water hardness scale is pretty much the same as Apple Valley (both are listed at 17 gpg on the last data I was able to find).

    I’ve lived in Eagan for 9 years………. get a water softener.

    #153860 Quote
    georgegeorge
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    @Viking wrote:

    @Beauner wrote:

    @Cowgirl wrote:

    @Beauner wrote:

    @davescharf wrote:

    @Beauner wrote:

    How hard is it to install a water softener? It’s pretty clear that the previous owner had one in at some point, as there is some copper piping looped around to nothing and there is a clear difference in color on the floor, as though something was sitting on the floor for an extended period of time.

    Is it something I’ll need expert knowledge to do (in which case something I’d be better off paying somebody to do)?

    That didn’t take long to find a bigger issue :wink:

    No, water softeners aren’t hard to install at all. The biggest issues are getting the water main shut off (my neighbors hadn’t been shut off in years and the shutoff valve broke when he went to do his) and transporting the softener.

    If you buy one the install cost may not be more than $100 – $200 more. Given my ability of fixing things like that I find that cost very much worth letting the professionals do it, but if you have a handy friend and enough beer you can save some money.

    I knew ahead of time that it didn’t have one :lol: Just hadn’t really thought about doing it before. I’m still not sure if I’m going to buy one, just wondering how much it would cost, budget wise.
    I’ve never lived in a house without a water softener so I dunno what “hard water” does. :lol:

    I haven’t even moved in yet, officially. Decided I’m going to paint and put in new floors/carpet in the rooms I want floors/new carpet in before I move in so I don’t have to move furniture twice.

    Laundry, dishes, and showers are usually a lot nicer with softened water. Do you still live in the AV area? With the amount of crap in our water you might need it!
    And good call on the paint and carpet first – I always do that. Unless cost to do it right away is an issue it sure seems like a no-brainer to me.

    Yeah, just moved to Eagan and the water hardness scale is pretty much the same as Apple Valley (both are listed at 17 gpg on the last data I was able to find).

    I’ve lived in Eagan for 9 years………. get a water softener.

    They are pretty easy to install (getting rid of my old one was harder). And you can buy it at Menards or Home Depot. Just research a bit and get a good one. My new one uses a fraction of the salt my old one did.

    #153861 Quote
    WPoSWPoS
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    @Beauner wrote:

    How hard is it to install a water softener? It’s pretty clear that the previous owner had one in at some point, as there is some copper piping looped around to nothing and there is a clear difference in color on the floor, as though something was sitting on the floor for an extended period of time.

    Is it something I’ll need expert knowledge to do (in which case something I’d be better off paying somebody to do)?

    With all the right parts about half an hour to install. You don’t NEED MAP gas, you can solder 3/4″ copper with the blue (propane) ones as well. I’d suggest putting a bypass in outside the one that comes with a softener so it’s easier to change/work on in the future. Also use BALL valves, not gate valves.

    Super simple….if you know how to solder. and make sure to avoid any dielectric issues.

    W

    #153862 Quote
    BertogliatBertogliat
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    @WPoS wrote:

    @Beauner wrote:

    How hard is it to install a water softener? It’s pretty clear that the previous owner had one in at some point, as there is some copper piping looped around to nothing and there is a clear difference in color on the floor, as though something was sitting on the floor for an extended period of time.

    Is it something I’ll need expert knowledge to do (in which case something I’d be better off paying somebody to do)?

    With all the right parts about half an hour to install. You don’t NEED MAP gas, you can solder 3/4″ copper with the blue (propane) ones as well. I’d suggest putting a bypass in outside the one that comes with a softener so it’s easier to change/work on in the future. Also use BALL valves, not gate valves.

    Super simple….if you know how to solder. and make sure to avoid any dielectric issues.

    W

    I guess we all assume everything’s copper. Sounds like an older home, so not likely PVC or pex.

    #153863 Quote
    georgegeorge
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    @WPoS wrote:

    @Beauner wrote:

    How hard is it to install a water softener? It’s pretty clear that the previous owner had one in at some point, as there is some copper piping looped around to nothing and there is a clear difference in color on the floor, as though something was sitting on the floor for an extended period of time.

    Is it something I’ll need expert knowledge to do (in which case something I’d be better off paying somebody to do)?

    With all the right parts about half an hour to install. You don’t NEED MAP gas, you can solder 3/4″ copper with the blue (propane) ones as well. I’d suggest putting a bypass in outside the one that comes with a softener so it’s easier to change/work on in the future. Also use BALL valves, not gate valves.

    Super simple….if you know how to solder. and make sure to avoid any dielectric issues.

    W

    Shark Bite and flex connectors, boom done.

    #153826 Quote
    BladepullerBladepuller
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    No, you don’t need MAP gas but it is hotter and if working with copper pipes that have had water in the extra heat helps vaporize any moisture.
    Another trick the plumber I preferred working with when I was a Supt. used was to clamp a small vise grip on pipes away from the sweated joint he was working on to act as a heat sink and retain the heat in the spot he was working on.
    Then again I’m not an engenear (SIC). I just had to put the chit together…. no matter how HS the documents were.

    #153813 Quote
    BertogliatBertogliat
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    The clamp is a brilliant idea! And there is nothing more frustrating than sweating a joint with a never ending trickle of water.

    In the past I have had to stuff a chunk of white bread in the pipe to stop the water. After you solder the pipe shut you have to take the filter screen of a faucet and wash the wet bread mess out of the pipe. It worked well!

    Might want to bypass a water softener for this trick!

    #153796 Quote
    BeaunerBeauner
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    Yeah since my experience with soldering was limited to like 7th grade shop class I’ll probably just go ahead and pay to have it done right. :lol:

    #153795 Quote
    WPoSWPoS
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    @Bertogliat wrote:

    The clamp is a brilliant idea! And there is nothing more frustrating than sweating a joint with a never ending trickle of water.

    In the past I have had to stuff a chunk of white bread in the pipe to stop the water. After you solder the pipe shut you have to take the filter screen of a faucet and wash the wet bread mess out of the pipe. It worked well!

    Might want to bypass a water softener for this trick!

    old trick true…but SOMETIMES the bread gets stuck! Been there/done that.

    W

    #153678 Quote
    g-manpuckg-manpuck
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    @WPoS wrote:

    @Bertogliat wrote:

    The clamp is a brilliant idea! And there is nothing more frustrating than sweating a joint with a never ending trickle of water.

    In the past I have had to stuff a chunk of white bread in the pipe to stop the water. After you solder the pipe shut you have to take the filter screen of a faucet and wash the wet bread mess out of the pipe. It worked well!

    Might want to bypass a water softener for this trick!

    old trick true…but SOMETIMES the bread gets stuck! Been there/done that.

    W

    Yes…there is a certain amount of bread to be used, too much and this problem happens. Other thing that works well…50/50 solder if you can find it, melts faster so you hold the heat back to get the trickle to vaporize and then get back up by the fitting and solder it and then the trickle returns to cool the joint back down. I know, I know…50/50 solder is bad for you. :mrgreen:

    #153679 Quote
    GO4GO4
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    Thanks to all those who offered insight to new home building! With much discussion we have prices for most of the upgrades we are interested in but are waiting on the builder to get us prices on a couple more. The process is ridiculous in my opinion – signing a purchase agreement (which we haven’t done yet) without finalizing all the details is frustrating and almost unfair.

    #153680 Quote
    Slap ShotSlap Shot
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    One reason not to buy here is a balloon might fall on your house. Pilot put down in the lot next to mine – 20 meters or so away from one side. :shock:


    #153681 Quote
    fightclub30fightclub30
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    @GO4 wrote:

    Thanks to all those who offered insight to new home building! With much discussion we have prices for most of the upgrades we are interested in but are waiting on the builder to get us prices on a couple more. The process is ridiculous in my opinion – signing a purchase agreement (which we haven’t done yet) without finalizing all the details is frustrating and almost unfair.

    That’s usually where they get you. Adding after a signed PA will cost double, triple, or even quadruple what it should because you are already committed.

    #153674 Quote
    KarlssonKarlsson
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    Haven’t had a hard water issue for years, and I have no softener. Of course this is because I’m in MPLS. They do a lot of treatment before it ever gets to the house. When I was up in Coon Rapids, softener was a must.

    #153675 Quote
    Steve MNSteve MN
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    If you’re on the Minneapolis system (Mpls, Crystal, Columbia Heights for sure, there may be more) there is no need for a softener. Say what you will about the Minneapolis Public Works department (or whatever the city calls it)… they do a great job with water treatment/delivery.

    #153676 Quote
    georgegeorge
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    @Karlsson wrote:

    Haven’t had a hard water issue for years, and I have no softener. Of course this is because I’m in MPLS. They do a lot of treatment before it ever gets to the house. When I was up in Coon Rapids, softener was a must.

    Mpls water is from the river. Surface sources are generally much softer since they didn’t migrate through 100′ of limestone, picking up calcium carbonate on the way. Mpls also uses flocculation to further clear the water of dissolved and suspended minerals.

    #153677 Quote
    Slap ShotSlap Shot
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    @Steve MN wrote:

    If you’re on the Minneapolis system (Mpls, Crystal, Columbia Heights for sure, there may be more) there is no need for a softener. Say what you will about the Minneapolis Public Works department (or whatever the city calls it)… they do a great job with water treatment/delivery.

    Apparently don’t tell George that.

    #153672 Quote
    Steve MNSteve MN
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    @Slap Shot wrote:

    @Steve MN wrote:

    If you’re on the Minneapolis system (Mpls, Crystal, Columbia Heights for sure, there may be more) there is no need for a softener. Say what you will about the Minneapolis Public Works department (or whatever the city calls it)… they do a great job with water treatment/delivery.

    Apparently don’t tell George that.

    All I said was that on Mpls water, you don’t need a softener. George explained why ;)

    #153673 Quote
    BeaunerBeauner
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    Holy crap, painting sucks.

    #153667 Quote
    BertogliatBertogliat
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    @Beauner wrote:

    Holy crap, painting sucks.

    It is the easiest and cheapest of home improvements.

    Enjoy :lol:

    If that sucks, don’t replace you water softener yourself.

    #153668 Quote
    BeaunerBeauner
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    @Bertogliat wrote:

    @Beauner wrote:

    Holy crap, painting sucks.

    It is the easiest and cheapest of home improvements.

    Enjoy :lol:

    If that sucks, don’t replace you water softener yourself.

    Well part of what sucks is the trim. It feels like it takes so long but you cover so little actual wall space. :chainsaw:
    I don’t mind taking the roller to the wall. That part you can actually see the progress :lol:

    And I decided as soon as people mentioned soldering that I was going to hire out the water softener install. I’d rather be sure it’s done right than try to do it myself to save some money and have it backfire.

    #153669 Quote
    dryflydryfly
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    @Beauner wrote:

    @Bertogliat wrote:

    @Beauner wrote:

    Holy crap, painting sucks.

    It is the easiest and cheapest of home improvements.

    Enjoy :lol:

    If that sucks, don’t replace you water softener yourself.

    Well part of what sucks is the trim. It feels like it takes so long but you cover so little actual wall space. :chainsaw:
    I don’t mind taking the roller to the wall. That part you can actually see the progress :lol:

    And I decided as soon as people mentioned soldering that I was going to hire out the water softener install. I’d rather be sure it’s done right than try to do it myself to save some money and have it backfire.

    Good choices. BTW painting gets a lot easier with practice. I don’t mind it now but first few times ooof.

    Soldering is easy after you do it but I would not want something like a water heater my first project.

    Good choices.

    #153670 Quote
    KarlssonKarlsson
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    Painting is a blast. The prep, however, can eat it.

    #153671 Quote
    gopher hockey fan 7gopher hockey fan 7
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    @Beauner wrote:

    @Bertogliat wrote:

    @Beauner wrote:

    Holy crap, painting sucks.

    It is the easiest and cheapest of home improvements.

    Enjoy :lol:

    If that sucks, don’t replace you water softener yourself.

    Well part of what sucks is the trim. It feels like it takes so long but you cover so little actual wall space. :chainsaw:
    I don’t mind taking the roller to the wall. That part you can actually see the progress :lol:

    And I decided as soon as people mentioned soldering that I was going to hire out the water softener install. I’d rather be sure it’s done right than try to do it myself to save some money and have it backfire.

    I’m right there with ya on painting. Feels like the trim and doors are taking decades. End result is looking nice though.

    I hate painting with a fiery passion.

    #153666 Quote
    BeaunerBeauner
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    @gopherhockeyfan7 wrote:

    @Beauner wrote:

    @Bertogliat wrote:

    @Beauner wrote:

    Holy crap, painting sucks.

    It is the easiest and cheapest of home improvements.

    Enjoy :lol:

    If that sucks, don’t replace you water softener yourself.

    Well part of what sucks is the trim. It feels like it takes so long but you cover so little actual wall space. :chainsaw:
    I don’t mind taking the roller to the wall. That part you can actually see the progress :lol:

    And I decided as soon as people mentioned soldering that I was going to hire out the water softener install. I’d rather be sure it’s done right than try to do it myself to save some money and have it backfire.

    I’m right there with ya on painting. Feels like the trim and doors are taking decades. End result is looking nice though.

    I hate painting with a fiery passion.

    Yeah on the plus side, the colors that I picked out are looking pretty good. Haven’t done the “man cave” yet (where I’ll have a couple maroon walls for my Gopher fandom, naturally), but the two main colors turned out pretty nice.

    #153665 Quote
    skiier32skiier32
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    @Beauner wrote:

    @gopherhockeyfan7 wrote:

    @Beauner wrote:

    @Bertogliat wrote:

    @Beauner wrote:

    Holy crap, painting sucks.

    It is the easiest and cheapest of home improvements.

    Enjoy :lol:

    If that sucks, don’t replace you water softener yourself.

    Well part of what sucks is the trim. It feels like it takes so long but you cover so little actual wall space. :chainsaw:
    I don’t mind taking the roller to the wall. That part you can actually see the progress :lol:

    And I decided as soon as people mentioned soldering that I was going to hire out the water softener install. I’d rather be sure it’s done right than try to do it myself to save some money and have it backfire.

    I’m right there with ya on painting. Feels like the trim and doors are taking decades. End result is looking nice though.

    I hate painting with a fiery passion.

    Yeah on the plus side, the colors that I picked out are looking pretty good. Haven’t done the “man cave” yet (where I’ll have a couple maroon walls for my Gopher fandom, naturally), but the two main colors turned out pretty nice.

    Here is my youngest son’s room with Gopher colors

    #153664 Quote
    g-manpuckg-manpuck
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    Buy a quality 2″ or 2-1/2″ angle brush that holds paint well and I never have to tape anything before painting. While I don’t love painting…I don’t hate it. The only real thing I despise in home renovation is sanding drywall, which is why I put on around 4 very thin layers of mud so that I sand as little as possible.

    #153663 Quote
    WPoSWPoS
    • Posts: 65
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    @gopherhockeyfan7 wrote:

    @Beauner wrote:

    @Bertogliat wrote:

    @Beauner wrote:

    Holy crap, painting sucks.

    It is the easiest and cheapest of home improvements.

    Enjoy :lol:

    If that sucks, don’t replace you water softener yourself.

    Well part of what sucks is the trim. It feels like it takes so long but you cover so little actual wall space. :chainsaw:
    I don’t mind taking the roller to the wall. That part you can actually see the progress :lol:

    And I decided as soon as people mentioned soldering that I was going to hire out the water softener install. I’d rather be sure it’s done right than try to do it myself to save some money and have it backfire.

    I’m right there with ya on painting. Feels like the trim and doors are taking decades. End result is looking nice though.

    I hate painting with a fiery passion.

    why would any sane person paint trim and doors? Why would you paint wood? :conf2:

    As stated ^^ a good brush and you don’t need to tape anything you just edge.

    W

    #153662 Quote
    BertogliatBertogliat
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    @WPoS wrote:

    @gopherhockeyfan7 wrote:

    @Beauner wrote:

    @Bertogliat wrote:

    @Beauner wrote:

    Holy crap, painting sucks.

    It is the easiest and cheapest of home improvements.

    Enjoy :lol:

    If that sucks, don’t replace you water softener yourself.

    Well part of what sucks is the trim. It feels like it takes so long but you cover so little actual wall space. :chainsaw:
    I don’t mind taking the roller to the wall. That part you can actually see the progress :lol:

    And I decided as soon as people mentioned soldering that I was going to hire out the water softener install. I’d rather be sure it’s done right than try to do it myself to save some money and have it backfire.

    I’m right there with ya on painting. Feels like the trim and doors are taking decades. End result is looking nice though.

    I hate painting with a fiery passion.

    why would any sane person paint trim and doors? Why would you paint wood? :conf2:

    As stated ^^ a good brush and you don’t need to tape anything you just edge.

    W

    I’ve never done it, but I could understand in some situations. My old house had former owners, not me, who were crappy painters and got white, sea foam green, orange, and brown paint all over the baseboards. I couldn’t find the baseboards anywhere so taking them off the walls was risky and left big holes as the baseboard came off, but the nails stayed behind. The house wasn’t worth a total trim redo.

    The easiest option would be to remove, fill holes, sand, and paint. But I made sure that wouldn’t happen by installing wood (stained) windows.

    Edit, come to think of it, I would have easily painted the kitchen cabinets in that house. The old cabinets were fine but ugly. Quarter sawn oak….blech. Busy and very ugly. I tried talking my wife into painting them. She wanted new. :shock: We had already priced ourselves out of that neighborhood. In the end someone bought it with the ugly cabinets.

    #153864 Quote
    WPoSWPoS
    • Posts: 65
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    @Bertogliat wrote:

    @WPoS wrote:

    @gopherhockeyfan7 wrote:

    @Beauner wrote:

    @Bertogliat wrote:

    @Beauner wrote:

    Holy crap, painting sucks.

    It is the easiest and cheapest of home improvements.

    Enjoy :lol:

    If that sucks, don’t replace you water softener yourself.

    Well part of what sucks is the trim. It feels like it takes so long but you cover so little actual wall space. :chainsaw:
    I don’t mind taking the roller to the wall. That part you can actually see the progress :lol:

    And I decided as soon as people mentioned soldering that I was going to hire out the water softener install. I’d rather be sure it’s done right than try to do it myself to save some money and have it backfire.

    I’m right there with ya on painting. Feels like the trim and doors are taking decades. End result is looking nice though.

    I hate painting with a fiery passion.

    why would any sane person paint trim and doors? Why would you paint wood? :conf2:

    As stated ^^ a good brush and you don’t need to tape anything you just edge.

    W

    Edit, come to think of it, I would have easily painted the kitchen cabinets in that house. The old cabinets were fine but ugly. Quarter sawn oak….blech. Busy and very ugly. I tried talking my wife into painting them. She wanted new. :shock: We had already priced ourselves out of that neighborhood. In the end someone bought it with the ugly cabinets.

    you DO understand how expensive 1/4 sawn wood is right?

    W

    #153865 Quote
    AHABulldogAHABulldog
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    @gopherhockeyfan7 wrote:

    @Beauner wrote:

    @Bertogliat wrote:

    @Beauner wrote:

    Holy crap, painting sucks.

    It is the easiest and cheapest of home improvements.

    Enjoy :lol:

    If that sucks, don’t replace you water softener yourself.

    Well part of what sucks is the trim. It feels like it takes so long but you cover so little actual wall space. :chainsaw:
    I don’t mind taking the roller to the wall. That part you can actually see the progress :lol:

    And I decided as soon as people mentioned soldering that I was going to hire out the water softener install. I’d rather be sure it’s done right than try to do it myself to save some money and have it backfire.

    I’m right there with ya on painting. Feels like the trim and doors are taking decades. End result is looking nice though.

    I hate painting with a fiery passion.

    My wife and I and a few of her friends painted our entire house (main level/upstairs) over a long holiday-weekend. About 40-something hours over 4 days. I was the painter’s tape/trim prep guy. I didn’t realize it until the end, but every time I peeled off a piece of painter’s tape I was slowly sanding off my thumbnail. When I went to shower the next morning I felt pain that I didn’t know existed. Brutal.

    After that weekend… never painting again. Although the cost savings was massive.

    #153866 Quote
    MNGophers29MNGophers29
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    @WPoS wrote:

    @Bertogliat wrote:

    @WPoS wrote:

    @gopherhockeyfan7 wrote:

    @Beauner wrote:

    @Bertogliat wrote:

    @Beauner wrote:

    Holy crap, painting sucks.

    It is the easiest and cheapest of home improvements.

    Enjoy :lol:

    If that sucks, don’t replace you water softener yourself.

    Well part of what sucks is the trim. It feels like it takes so long but you cover so little actual wall space. :chainsaw:
    I don’t mind taking the roller to the wall. That part you can actually see the progress :lol:

    And I decided as soon as people mentioned soldering that I was going to hire out the water softener install. I’d rather be sure it’s done right than try to do it myself to save some money and have it backfire.

    I’m right there with ya on painting. Feels like the trim and doors are taking decades. End result is looking nice though.

    I hate painting with a fiery passion.

    why would any sane person paint trim and doors? Why would you paint wood? :conf2:

    As stated ^^ a good brush and you don’t need to tape anything you just edge.

    W

    Edit, come to think of it, I would have easily painted the kitchen cabinets in that house. The old cabinets were fine but ugly. Quarter sawn oak….blech. Busy and very ugly. I tried talking my wife into painting them. She wanted new. :shock: We had already priced ourselves out of that neighborhood. In the end someone bought it with the ugly cabinets.

    you DO understand how expensive 1/4 sawn wood is right?

    W

    This. It is an acquired taste though.

    I am also in the camp that it is a crime to paint wood. I make children’s tables and chairs and I tell people that I will finish them for you, but if you want them painted, you can do it yourself.

    #153867 Quote
    BertogliatBertogliat
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    @WPoS wrote:

    @Bertogliat wrote:

    @WPoS wrote:

    @gopherhockeyfan7 wrote:

    @Beauner wrote:

    @Bertogliat wrote:

    @Beauner wrote:

    Holy crap, painting sucks.

    It is the easiest and cheapest of home improvements.

    Enjoy :lol:

    If that sucks, don’t replace you water softener yourself.

    Well part of what sucks is the trim. It feels like it takes so long but you cover so little actual wall space. :chainsaw:
    I don’t mind taking the roller to the wall. That part you can actually see the progress :lol:

    And I decided as soon as people mentioned soldering that I was going to hire out the water softener install. I’d rather be sure it’s done right than try to do it myself to save some money and have it backfire.

    I’m right there with ya on painting. Feels like the trim and doors are taking decades. End result is looking nice though.

    I hate painting with a fiery passion.

    why would any sane person paint trim and doors? Why would you paint wood? :conf2:

    As stated ^^ a good brush and you don’t need to tape anything you just edge.

    W

    Edit, come to think of it, I would have easily painted the kitchen cabinets in that house. The old cabinets were fine but ugly. Quarter sawn oak….blech. Busy and very ugly. I tried talking my wife into painting them. She wanted new. :shock: We had already priced ourselves out of that neighborhood. In the end someone bought it with the ugly cabinets.

    you DO understand how expensive 1/4 sawn wood is right?

    W

    The siding of the house was 12 x 1″ cedar planks. That stuff is also very expensive (each board was about $45). So someone originally spent a lot of money on wood for the house. Unfortunately it’s in Coon Rapids and you can’t get your money back these days replacing with like materials.

    And as far as quarter sawn oak, I do understand it is very expensive, yet it is very busy/ugly on kitchen cabinets.

    #153868 Quote
    dryflydryfly
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    @MNGophers29 wrote:

    @WPoS wrote:

    @Bertogliat wrote:

    @WPoS wrote:

    @gopherhockeyfan7 wrote:

    @Beauner wrote:

    @Bertogliat wrote:

    It is the easiest and cheapest of home improvements.

    Enjoy :lol:

    If that sucks, don’t replace you water softener yourself.

    Well part of what sucks is the trim. It feels like it takes so long but you cover so little actual wall space. :chainsaw:
    I don’t mind taking the roller to the wall. That part you can actually see the progress :lol:

    And I decided as soon as people mentioned soldering that I was going to hire out the water softener install. I’d rather be sure it’s done right than try to do it myself to save some money and have it backfire.

    I’m right there with ya on painting. Feels like the trim and doors are taking decades. End result is looking nice though.

    I hate painting with a fiery passion.

    why would any sane person paint trim and doors? Why would you paint wood? :conf2:

    As stated ^^ a good brush and you don’t need to tape anything you just edge.

    W

    Edit, come to think of it, I would have easily painted the kitchen cabinets in that house. The old cabinets were fine but ugly. Quarter sawn oak….blech. Busy and very ugly. I tried talking my wife into painting them. She wanted new. :shock: We had already priced ourselves out of that neighborhood. In the end someone bought it with the ugly cabinets.

    you DO understand how expensive 1/4 sawn wood is right?

    W

    This. It is an acquired taste though.

    I am also in the camp that it is a crime to paint wood. I make children’s tables and chairs and I tell people that I will finish them for you, but if you want them painted, you can do it yourself.

    If you all come across quarter sawn again you might decide to call in a guy who buys rehab and recycle before painting over. The price you get on quarter sawn, walnut, quality hard maple, cherry – etc – might pay for new already painted ‘cheap’ cabinets. If just veneered plywood no way but if solid quality hardwood – people find ways to repurpose that stuff and will pay to get a hold of it.

    Just a hint.

    #153869 Quote
    rowshkexrowshkex
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    I’d kill for some high-quality wood finishes in a future house… And not painted, of course–gross. :mrgreen:

    #153870 Quote
    BeaunerBeauner
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    Back to water softeners– my house is a 1.5 bathroom, 2 bedroom house. Would a 27,000 grain water softener be sufficient? Or would it need to bump up to 34,000? The 27k grain says max water hardness is 95gpg which is way over the number for Eagan. But is it going to be powerful enough/strong enough to work?

    #153871 Quote
    MNGophers29MNGophers29
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    @Beauner wrote:

    Back to water softeners– my house is a 1.5 bathroom, 2 bedroom house. Would a 27,000 grain water softener be sufficient? Or would it need to bump up to 34,000? The 27k grain says max water hardness is 95gpg which is way over the number for Eagan. But is it going to be powerful enough/strong enough to work?

    Go with the bigger one.
    https://www.aquatell.com/pages/how-to-properly-size-a-water-softener

    #153872 Quote
    BladepullerBladepuller
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    Youngest daughter (tBeliever to you old timers) & S i L bought a bid azz house in Ham Lake. It was bank owned (previous owner was a rat res. elec. cont.) who did way to much of his own carpentry & plumbing. Knotty pine doors and trim. After being in it for 5 1/2 years they tore out all the Knotty Pine and replaced it with a MDF type product for trim and Birch doors. Every thing in the place is now painted and looks great. Having big wide tall wraps w/ pintel blocks fits the windows & doors and the 4 piece base is around 9″ high.
    It looks very nice and light & airy inside.
    Paint does have it’s place on doors & trim.

    #153873 Quote
    dryflydryfly
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    @Bladepuller wrote:

    Youngest daughter (tBeliever to you old timers) & S i L bought a bid azz house in Ham Lake. It was bank owned (previous owner was a rat res. elec. cont.) who did way to much of his own carpentry & plumbing. Knotty pine doors and trim. After being in it for 5 1/2 years they tore out all the Knotty Pine and replaced it with a MDF type product for trim and Birch doors. Every thing in the place is now painted and looks great. Having big wide tall wraps w/ pintel blocks fits the windows & doors and the 4 piece base is around 9″ high.
    It looks very nice and light & airy inside.
    Paint does have it’s place on doors & trim.

    A lot of our ideas about wood finish comes from high class older homes – victorians and craftsman era. Set style and fashion expectations ever since. Nice houses have finished hardwood. Period. That is the stereotype.

    But you are right – even in old houses – meaning historically old. Painted trim is not that unusual and can look great.

    #153874 Quote
    MNGophers29MNGophers29
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    Painted trim is the fad right now along with the whites and grays look. I will admit, it does look sharp. But, it is just fad. There will never be a substitution for the natural beauty of wood.

    #153875 Quote
    CowgirlCowgirl
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    @MNGophers29 wrote:

    Painted trim is the fad right now along with the whites and grays look. I will admit, it does look sharp. But, it is just fad. There will never be a substitution for the natural beauty of wood.

    Amen.

    #153876 Quote
    davescharfdavescharf
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    Does anyone have a good way of removing cat urine odor? The renters at my dad’s townhouse had a cat that seemed to like to pee everywhere. So far Kilz and fresh paint have helped, but for the basement (which isn’t finished) does anyone have a good suggestion to get rid of it?

    #153877 Quote
    CowgirlCowgirl
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    @davescharf wrote:

    Does anyone have a good way of removing cat urine odor? The renters at my dad’s townhouse had a cat that seemed to like to pee everywhere. So far Kilz and fresh paint have helped, but for the basement (which isn’t finished) does anyone have a good suggestion to get rid of it?

    Anti Icky Poo. It’s an enzymatic cleaner that breaks down the residual organic matter and bacteria that are still producing odor (bacteria farts!). The key is to saturate the fabric/material etc and let it sit (so if on carpet/flooring test in inconspicuous area lest it stain). If it’s in carpet you need to get down to the pad so need to use a lot. Removing the stained material is usually the best defense but I know that’s not always possible. Buy a gallon of it if you have a lot of area to do! Looks like it comes in unscented too.

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/s/ref=is_s?k=anti+icky+poo

    #153878 Quote
    BigbeerBigbeer
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    @davescharf wrote:

    Does anyone have a good way of removing cat urine odor? The renters at my dad’s townhouse had a cat that seemed to like to pee everywhere. So far Kilz and fresh paint have helped, but for the basement (which isn’t finished) does anyone have a good suggestion to get rid of it?

    Natures Miracle

    #153879 Quote
    BertogliatBertogliat
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    @Cowgirl wrote:

    @MNGophers29 wrote:

    Painted trim is the fad right now along with the whites and grays look. I will admit, it does look sharp. But, it is just fad. There will never be a substitution for the natural beauty of wood.

    Amen.

    Not THAT kind of wood.

    Painted trim sounds intriguing, I have to admit I’ve never seen it. But not gray or white!

    #153880 Quote
    dryflydryfly
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    @davescharf wrote:

    Does anyone have a good way of removing cat urine odor? The renters at my dad’s townhouse had a cat that seemed to like to pee everywhere. So far Kilz and fresh paint have helped, but for the basement (which isn’t finished) does anyone have a good suggestion to get rid of it?

    Vinegar. Let it sit soak. Then rinse a lot and vacuum with wet vac. Rinse repeat a few times. Vinegar dissolves the urine really well. Works best on textiles – like blankets, throw rugs, clothes. Throw them in the washer with a couple two three cups of vinegar – no soap. Then rewash wth regular detergent. Does a really good job. Don’t know about wood or concrete – say walls or floors. Or wall to wall carpet. I would guess it would IF the solution can get contact with contaminated surfaces.

    #153881 Quote
    dryflydryfly
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    @MNGophers29 wrote:

    Painted trim is the fad right now along with the whites and grays look. I will admit, it does look sharp. But, it is just fad. There will never be a substitution for the natural beauty of wood.

    It is a ‘fad’ that has been around for over 100 years. And I agree great natural wood is best but high quality natural hardwood or clear pine has always been somewhat rare and expensive – painted looks a lot better than crap woodeven well finished and unfortunately that is what is mostly available today. I occasionally stop in at hardwood mills and the available product is not what it used to be.

    #153882 Quote
    dryflydryfly
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    @Bertogliat wrote:

    @Cowgirl wrote:

    @MNGophers29 wrote:

    Painted trim is the fad right now along with the whites and grays look. I will admit, it does look sharp. But, it is just fad. There will never be a substitution for the natural beauty of wood.

    Amen.

    Not THAT kind of wood.

    Painted trim sounds intriguing, I have to admit I’ve never seen it. But not gray or white!

    White trim with colored walls can be very nice too – that has been done since the 1910 to 1920’s. That was how the upstairs of our house was when originally built around 1915. Surprisingly colorful. Discovered that when we renovated – scraped down to base plaster.

    #153883 Quote
    davescharfdavescharf
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    @dryfly wrote:

    @davescharf wrote:

    Does anyone have a good way of removing cat urine odor? The renters at my dad’s townhouse had a cat that seemed to like to pee everywhere. So far Kilz and fresh paint have helped, but for the basement (which isn’t finished) does anyone have a good suggestion to get rid of it?

    Vinegar. Let it sit soak. Then rinse a lot and vacuum with wet vac. Rinse repeat a few times. Vinegar dissolves the urine really well. Works best on textiles – like blankets, throw rugs, clothes. Throw them in the washer with a couple two three cups of vinegar – no soap. Then rewash wth regular detergent. Does a really good job. Don’t know about wood or concrete – say walls or floors. Or wall to wall carpet. I would guess it would IF the solution can get contact with contaminated surfaces.

    Thanks for all the ideas. Dad chose to rip out all the carpeting and pad underneath and buy all new stuff. The stairs into the basement and the concrete in the basement both still smell quite a bit though

    #153884 Quote
    BertogliatBertogliat
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    @dryfly wrote:

    @Bertogliat wrote:

    @Cowgirl wrote:

    @MNGophers29 wrote:

    Painted trim is the fad right now along with the whites and grays look. I will admit, it does look sharp. But, it is just fad. There will never be a substitution for the natural beauty of wood.

    Amen.

    Not THAT kind of wood.

    Painted trim sounds intriguing, I have to admit I’ve never seen it. But not gray or white!

    White trim with colored walls can be very nice too – that has been done since the 1910 to 1920’s. That was how the upstairs of our house was when originally built around 1915. Surprisingly colorful. Discovered that when we renovated – scraped down to base plaster.

    I was taking about “trim.”

    And hard “wood.”

    #153885 Quote
    BeaunerBeauner
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    Flooring purchased, carpet purchased, water softener purchased ended up going with the 34k grains per recommendation from MNGophers29. Installing all of these tomorrow/Tuesday (my dad’s co-worker is going to install the water softener for me, he used to be a contractor and still has all the necessary tools).

    Painting almost done (have a couple touch-ups to make in a couple areas but we’ll wait until I finish moving in in case I ding a wall or two).
    For the record, when I was using the word “trim” I was talking about the corners/ceilings. Not actually painting wood trim like crown molding etc. I’m not sure that I’d paint over natural wood if it was up to me. I love the look of natural wood.

    Fixed (for the most part) the squeak in the floor in the family room – whoever installed the subfloor did a pretty poor job getting the subfloor screwed/nailed into the joists – after pulling the carpet out you could see 10-15 nails that were just bent over and hammered into the subfloor instead of hammered into the joists. Led to a pretty significant squeak in one area of the room anytime somebody walked on it. 8-10 carpentry screws later, the squeak is mostly gone (there is still 1 tiny area that squeaks but it seems like no matter how many screws we added to, it wouldn’t go away completely, it just got slightly quieter with each screw). We’re holding out hope that once the floor is added, the squeak will be barely noticeable. If not, meh, it’s going to be in a place that nobody will be walking anyways.

    Now I’ll just have to sand down and re-finish/paint the handrailings and the outside ends of the stairs (already painted black by previous owner, showing some wear and tear at some places) at some point. That’ll be for another weekend though. I’m just about “projected” out. :lol:

    #153886 Quote
    MNGophers29MNGophers29
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    @dryfly wrote:

    @Bertogliat wrote:

    @Cowgirl wrote:

    @MNGophers29 wrote:

    Painted trim is the fad right now along with the whites and grays look. I will admit, it does look sharp. But, it is just fad. There will never be a substitution for the natural beauty of wood.

    Amen.

    Not THAT kind of wood.

    Painted trim sounds intriguing, I have to admit I’ve never seen it. But not gray or white!

    White trim with colored walls can be very nice too – that has been done since the 1910 to 1920’s. That was how the upstairs of our house was when originally built around 1915. Surprisingly colorful. Discovered that when we renovated – scraped down to base plaster.

    It’s been around, but white trim, white upper cabinets and gray lower cabinets is a current trend. That has never been a design feature before in homes. In the last year, White/gray countertops have surpassed countertop colors that have been the top colors for the past 15-20 years. While the option and rare case of people doing it has always been around, the current design/decor color scheme is a fad.

    Paint hasn’t always been as cheap or as easy as it is to come by now either. Stained wood will always stand the test of time.

    #153887 Quote
    BeaunerBeauner
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    @MNGophers29 wrote:

    @dryfly wrote:

    @Bertogliat wrote:

    @Cowgirl wrote:

    @MNGophers29 wrote:

    Painted trim is the fad right now along with the whites and grays look. I will admit, it does look sharp. But, it is just fad. There will never be a substitution for the natural beauty of wood.

    Amen.

    Not THAT kind of wood.

    Painted trim sounds intriguing, I have to admit I’ve never seen it. But not gray or white!

    White trim with colored walls can be very nice too – that has been done since the 1910 to 1920’s. That was how the upstairs of our house was when originally built around 1915. Surprisingly colorful. Discovered that when we renovated – scraped down to base plaster.

    It’s been around, but white trim, white upper cabinets and gray lower cabinets is a current trend. That has never been a design feature before in homes. In the last year, White/gray countertops have surpassed countertop colors that have been the top colors for the past 15-20 years. While the option and rare case of people doing it has always been around, the current design/decor color scheme is a fad.

    Paint hasn’t always been as cheap or as easy as it is to come by now either. Stained wood will always stand the test of time.

    Yep. When I was doing my house search, a lot of the ones I saw that featured an “Updated, modern kitchen” had the white/grey/black color scheme, often with the white cabinets and grey or black counter with black and white or grey and white flooring.

    #153888 Quote
    gopher hockey fan 7gopher hockey fan 7
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    @MNGophers29 wrote:

    @dryfly wrote:

    @Bertogliat wrote:

    @Cowgirl wrote:

    @MNGophers29 wrote:

    Painted trim is the fad right now along with the whites and grays look. I will admit, it does look sharp. But, it is just fad. There will never be a substitution for the natural beauty of wood.

    Amen.

    Not THAT kind of wood.

    Painted trim sounds intriguing, I have to admit I’ve never seen it. But not gray or white!

    White trim with colored walls can be very nice too – that has been done since the 1910 to 1920’s. That was how the upstairs of our house was when originally built around 1915. Surprisingly colorful. Discovered that when we renovated – scraped down to base plaster.

    It’s been around, but white trim, white upper cabinets and gray lower cabinets is a current trend. That has never been a design feature before in homes. In the last year, White/gray countertops have surpassed countertop colors that have been the top colors for the past 15-20 years. While the option and rare case of people doing it has always been around, the current design/decor color scheme is a fad.

    Paint hasn’t always been as cheap or as easy as it is to come by now either. Stained wood will always stand the test of time.

    The wood trim and railings in our house were in such rough shape when we moved in. It looks a lot better painted white, and since we went with darker walls, it really brightens it up in there too.

    We hardly had to sand them prior to painting. There was nothing on there.

    #153889 Quote
    ZwakZwak
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    I’m really late to the game on this discussion but we had a water softener put in about 7 years ago and have no regrets. Couple quick things:

    1. Your city MIGHT have a fee for purchasing a water softener. When we purchased ours, they looked up our city and found there was a small fee one time fee for having a water softener. Same goes for a new water heater.

    2. The first time we used our faucets/toilets after installing the softener the water came out brown. This went away after running the faucets for a while and flushing the toilets several times.

    #153890 Quote
    OrionOrion
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    So talk of cabinets in another thread got me thinking about remodeling the kitchen. Question is who to ask about decent cabinets? Where do I start to find quality cabinets without going full custom? The concern is cost. I don’t need anything special and should be able to fit in standard cabinets.

    #153891 Quote
    MNGophers29MNGophers29
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    @Orion wrote:

    So talk of cabinets in another thread got me thinking about remodeling the kitchen. Question is who to ask about decent cabinets? Where do I start to find quality cabinets without going full custom? The concern is cost. I don’t need anything special and should be able to fit in standard cabinets.

    Do you currently have cabinets? If you do, are the boxes in good shape and are you happy with the layout? If so, check out refacing them as an option. 2-4 weeks vs 2-4 months. No disturbance to the functionality of your kitchen and they will look brand new for less than full remodel.

    There are hundreds of different brands, any of the big boxes would be a good place to start. All will talk to you about options, base prices, etc without the need to pay a large consult fee some of the specialty shops charge you.

    You can PM me for more information if you like. I am biased towards one company, but I will give you honest feedback. I also build cabinets myself too (not that I am selling my services) but I can offer a perspective from the sales side, the vendor side, the installation side and the construction of the cabinet viewpoint.

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